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Underrepresentation of African-Americans in Alzheimer's Trials: A Call for Affirmative Action

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      2015 Alzheimer's disease facts and figures.

        (2015)
      This report discusses the public health impact of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), including incidence and prevalence, mortality rates, costs of care and the overall effect on caregivers and society. It also examines the challenges encountered by health care providers when disclosing an AD diagnosis to patients and caregivers. An estimated 5.3 million Americans have AD; 5.1 million are age 65 years, and approximately 200,000 are age <65 years and have younger onset AD. By mid-century, the number of people living with AD in the United States is projected to grow by nearly 10 million, fueled in large part by the aging baby boom generation. Today, someone in the country develops AD every 67 seconds. By 2050, one new case of AD is expected to develop every 33 seconds, resulting in nearly 1 million new cases per year, and the estimated prevalence is expected to range from 11 million to 16 million. In 2013, official death certificates recorded 84,767 deaths from AD, making AD the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and the fifth leading cause of death in Americans age 65 years. Between 2000 and 2013, deaths resulting from heart disease, stroke and prostate cancer decreased 14%, 23% and 11%, respectively, whereas deaths from AD increased 71%. The actual number of deaths to which AD contributes (or deaths with AD) is likely much larger than the number of deaths from AD recorded on death certificates. In 2015, an estimated 700,000 Americans age 65 years will die with AD, and many of them will die from complications caused by AD. In 2014, more than 15 million family members and other unpaid caregivers provided an estimated 17.9 billion hours of care to people with AD and other dementias, a contribution valued at more than $217 billion. Average per-person Medicare payments for services to beneficiaries age 65 years with AD and other dementias are more than two and a half times as great as payments for all beneficiaries without these conditions, and Medicaid payments are 19 times as great. Total payments in 2015 for health care, long-term care and hospice services for people age 65 years with dementia are expected to be $226 billion. Among people with a diagnosis of AD or another dementia, fewer than half report having been told of the diagnosis by their health care provider. Though the benefits of a prompt, clear and accurate disclosure of an AD diagnosis are recognized by the medical profession, improvements to the disclosure process are needed. These improvements may require stronger support systems for health care providers and their patients.
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        Overview and findings from the rush Memory and Aging Project.

        The Memory and Aging Project is a longitudinal, epidemiologic clinical-pathologic cohort study of common chronic conditions of aging with an emphasis on decline in cognitive and motor function and risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this manuscript, we first summarize the study design and methods. Then, we present data on: (1) the relation of motor function to cognition, disability, and death; (2) the relation of risk factors to cognitive and motor outcomes, disability and death; (3) the relation of neuropathologic indices to cognitive outcomes; (4) the relation of risk factors to neuropathologic indices; and (5) additional study findings. The findings are discussed and contextualized.
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          The Mayo Clinic Study of Aging: design and sampling, participation, baseline measures and sample characteristics.

          The objective of this study was to establish a prospective population-based cohort to investigate the prevalence, incidence and risk factors for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia. The Olmsted County, Minn., population, aged 70-89 years on October 1, 2004, was enumerated using the Rochester Epidemiology Project. Eligible subjects were randomly selected and invited to participate. Participants underwent a comprehensive in-person evaluation including the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale, a neurological evaluation and neuropsychological testing. A consensus diagnosis of normal cognition, MCI or dementia was made by a panel using previously published criteria. A subsample of subjects was studied via telephone interview. Four hundred and two subjects with dementia were identified from a detailed review of their medical records but were not contacted. At baseline, we successfully evaluated 703 women aged 70-79 years, 769 women aged 80-89 years, 730 men aged 70-79 years and 517 men aged 80-89 years (total n = 2,719). Among the participants, 2,050 subjects were evaluated in person and 669 via telephone. Strengths of the study are that the subjects were randomly selected from a defined population, the majority of the subjects were examined in person, and MCI was defined using published criteria. Here, we report the design and sampling, participation, baseline measures and sample characteristics. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            1Division of Translational Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, Duke University Medical Center Durham, NC, USA
            2Duke Institute for Brain Sciences Durham, NC, USA
            3Duke Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development Durham, NC, USA
            Author notes

            Edited by: P. Hemachandra Reddy, Texas Tech University, USA

            Reviewed by: Ramesh Kandimalla, Emory University, USA; Tejaswini Parlapalle Reddy, Texas Tech University Health Science Center, USA

            *Correspondence: Jaewook Shin jae.wook.shin@ 123456duke.edu
            Contributors
            Journal
            Front Aging Neurosci
            Front Aging Neurosci
            Front. Aging Neurosci.
            Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience
            Frontiers Media S.A.
            1663-4365
            03 June 2016
            2016
            : 8
            27375473
            4891330
            10.3389/fnagi.2016.00123
            Copyright © 2016 Shin and Doraiswamy.

            This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

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            Figures: 0, Tables: 1, Equations: 0, References: 25, Pages: 4, Words: 2601
            Categories
            Neuroscience
            Opinion

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