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      Special features of RAD Sequencing data: implications for genotyping

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          Abstract

          Restriction site-associated DNA Sequencing (RAD-Seq) is an economical and efficient method for SNP discovery and genotyping. As with other sequencing-by-synthesis methods, RAD-Seq produces stochastic count data and requires sensitive analysis to develop or genotype markers accurately. We show that there are several sources of bias specific to RAD-Seq that are not explicitly addressed by current genotyping tools, namely restriction fragment bias, restriction site heterozygosity and PCR GC content bias. We explore the performance of existing analysis tools given these biases and discuss approaches to limiting or handling biases in RAD-Seq data. While these biases need to be taken seriously, we believe RAD loci affected by them can be excluded or processed with relative ease in most cases and that most RAD loci will be accurately genotyped by existing tools.

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          Most cited references 39

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          AFLP: a new technique for DNA fingerprinting.

          A novel DNA fingerprinting technique called AFLP is described. The AFLP technique is based on the selective PCR amplification of restriction fragments from a total digest of genomic DNA. The technique involves three steps: (i) restriction of the DNA and ligation of oligonucleotide adapters, (ii) selective amplification of sets of restriction fragments, and (iii) gel analysis of the amplified fragments. PCR amplification of restriction fragments is achieved by using the adapter and restriction site sequence as target sites for primer annealing. The selective amplification is achieved by the use of primers that extend into the restriction fragments, amplifying only those fragments in which the primer extensions match the nucleotides flanking the restriction sites. Using this method, sets of restriction fragments may be visualized by PCR without knowledge of nucleotide sequence. The method allows the specific co-amplification of high numbers of restriction fragments. The number of fragments that can be analyzed simultaneously, however, is dependent on the resolution of the detection system. Typically 50-100 restriction fragments are amplified and detected on denaturing polyacrylamide gels. The AFLP technique provides a novel and very powerful DNA fingerprinting technique for DNAs of any origin or complexity.
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            Stampy: a statistical algorithm for sensitive and fast mapping of Illumina sequence reads.

            High-volume sequencing of DNA and RNA is now within reach of any research laboratory and is quickly becoming established as a key research tool. In many workflows, each of the short sequences ("reads") resulting from a sequencing run are first "mapped" (aligned) to a reference sequence to infer the read from which the genomic location derived, a challenging task because of the high data volumes and often large genomes. Existing read mapping software excel in either speed (e.g., BWA, Bowtie, ELAND) or sensitivity (e.g., Novoalign), but not in both. In addition, performance often deteriorates in the presence of sequence variation, particularly so for short insertions and deletions (indels). Here, we present a read mapper, Stampy, which uses a hybrid mapping algorithm and a detailed statistical model to achieve both speed and sensitivity, particularly when reads include sequence variation. This results in a higher useable sequence yield and improved accuracy compared to that of existing software.
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              A large genome center's improvements to the Illumina sequencing system.

              The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute is one of the world's largest genome centers, and a substantial amount of our sequencing is performed with 'next-generation' massively parallel sequencing technologies: in June 2008 the quantity of purity-filtered sequence data generated by our Genome Analyzer (Illumina) platforms reached 1 terabase, and our average weekly Illumina production output is currently 64 gigabases. Here we describe a set of improvements we have made to the standard Illumina protocols to make the library preparation more reliable in a high-throughput environment, to reduce bias, tighten insert size distribution and reliably obtain high yields of data.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Mol Ecol
                Mol. Ecol
                mec
                Molecular Ecology
                Blackwell Publishing Ltd
                0962-1083
                1365-294X
                June 2013
                30 October 2012
                : 22
                : 11
                : 3151-3164
                Affiliations
                [* ]Institute of Evolutionary Biology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh West Mains Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3JT, UK
                []The GenePool, Ashworth Laboratories, University of Edinburgh West Mains Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3JT, UK
                Author notes
                John W. Davey, Fax: +44 (0)131 650 5455, E-mail: john.davey@ 123456ed.ac.uk .
                Article
                10.1111/mec.12084
                3712469
                23110438
                Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd

                Re-use of this article is permitted in accordance with the Creative Commons Deed, Attribution 2.5, which does not permit commercial exploitation.

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