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      Micosis superficiales en pacientes del estado Anzoátegui, Venezuela, periodo 2002-2012 Translated title: Superficial mycoses in patients from Anzoátegui state, Venezuela, period 2002-2012

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          Abstract

          Las enfermedades fúngicas superficiales que afectan la piel y sus faneras son motivo de consultas en los servicios básicos de triaje y en dermatología. Se encuentran distribuidas en Venezuela con una incidencia de 92,9%. El objetivo del presente estudio fue conocer los géneros y especies que causan dermatomicosis en pacientes residentes del estado Anzoátegui, Venezuela, en el período 2002-2012. Se estudiaron 4257 pacientes con edades entre 7 meses y 79 años. La prevalencia general fue de 30,9%. Las más frecuentes fueron las dermatofitosis (44,7%). M. canis produjo 148 casos de tiña de la cabeza. Tres agentes dermatofiticos representaron el 95% de todos los casos, con predominio significativo de T. mentagrophytes representado por un 50%. La candidosis se presentó en 28,4%. C. albicans, y el complejo C. parapsilosis, fueron responsables del 80% de los casos. Otras especies identificadas fueron C. tropicalis (n = 41; 11,0%), C. glabrata (n = 10; 2,7%), C. guilliermondii (n = 6; 1,6%), C. krusei (n = 4; 1,1%). Pitiriasis versicolor se presentó en (22,4%), y en menor frecuencia la onicomicosis por mohos no dermatofitos, dominando Fusarium oxysporum (n = 34; 65,4%), Aspergillus terreus (n = 16; 30,8%) y Scytalidium dimidiatum (2; 3,8%). Raros casos de onicomicosis por Trichosporon (0,5%) y un caso de tinea negra. Estos resultados revelan una alta frecuencia de las micosis superficiales con predominio de las dermatofitosis indicando la existencia de un problema de salud pública.

          Translated abstract

          Superficial fungal diseases that affect the skin and its appendages are frequently seen in basic triage and in dermatology services. These diseases are distributed in Venezuela with an incidence of 92.9%. The aim of this study was to determine the genera and species that cause dermatomycoses in residents of Anzoátegui state, Venezuela, during the period 2002-2012. A total of 4257 patients with a presumptive diagnosis of superficial mycoses were studied, with ages from 7 months to 79 years. The overall prevalence was 30.9%. The most frequent were dermatophytosis (44.7%). M. canis produced 148 cases of tinea capitis. Three dermatophytic agents represented 95% of all cases, with a significant predominance of T. mentagrophytes with 50%. Candidosis occurred in 28.4%. C. albicans, and the C. parapsilosis complex, were responsible for 80% of the cases. The other species identified were C. tropicalis (n = 41, 11.0%), C. glabrata (n = 10, 2.7%), C. guilliermondii (n = 6, 1.6%), C. krusei (n = 4, 1.1%). Pityriasis versicolor occurred in 22.4% of the cases studied, and less frequently were present onychomycosis produced by a non dermatophytic mold: Fusarium oxysporum (n = 34, 65.4%), Aspergillus terreus (n=16, 30.8%) and Scytalidium dimidiatum (n=2; 3.8%). Rare cases of Trichosporon onychomycosis (0.5%) and one case of black tinea were also found. Health education in the population is recommended to promote measures to prevent transmission of these fungi and prevent the spread of this silent public health problem.

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          Most cited references36

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          Micología General

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            The role of Candida albicans secreted aspartic proteinase in the development of candidoses.

            Although Candida albicans infections in humans are increasingly frequent, our understanding of the host-parasite relationship is limited. The secreted aspartic proteinase of C. albicans was first described in 1965 and has proved to be a major factor in virulence. This enzyme belongs to the class of aspartic proteinases which includes pepsin and renin in humans. Although found in some fungi, secreted aspartic proteinase is rare in these organisms. While the existence of several isoenzymes may not be fully established, it is now obvious that at least seven different genes encode for secreted aspartic proteinase. Within Candida cells it is located in membrane-bound vesicles. Upon fusion of these subcellular structures within the plasma membrane, the enzyme is released to the environment. In the context of human mucosal diseases it is responsible both for adhesion and invasion. Strains from HIV-infected patients with oral candidosis generally exhibit higher enzymatic activity than control strains. In future secreted aspartic proteinase may prove a prime target for new types of antimycotics.
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              Micosis superficiales y dermatomicosis

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Journal
                ic
                Investigación Clínica
                Invest. clín
                Universidad del Zulia
                0535-5133
                December 2014
                : 55
                : 4
                : 311-320
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Universidad de Oriente, Núcleo de Anzoátegui Venezuela
                [2 ] Hospital Ernesto Guzmán Saavedra Venezuela
                [3 ] Universidad de Oriente, Núcleo de Anzoátegui Venezuela
                [4 ] Universidad de Oriente, Núcleo de Anzoátegui Venezuela
                Article
                S0535-51332014000400003
                2500dc31-61d7-4b83-81cd-62ea66a8f594

                http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                History
                Product

                SciELO Venezuela

                Self URI (journal page): http://www.scielo.org.ve/scielo.php?script=sci_serial&pid=0535-5133&lng=en
                Categories
                MEDICINE, RESEARCH & EXPERIMENTAL

                Medicine
                Venezuela,dermatomycosis,dermatophytes,yeast,dermatomicosis,dermatofitos,levaduras
                Medicine
                Venezuela, dermatomycosis, dermatophytes, yeast, dermatomicosis, dermatofitos, levaduras

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