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      Recognition memory strength is predicted by pupillary responses at encoding while fixation patterns distinguish recollection from familiarity.

      Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology (2006)

      Young Adult, physiology, Recognition (Psychology), Reaction Time, Pupil, Photic Stimulation, Mental Recall, Memory, Male, Humans, Fixation, Ocular, Female, Eye Movements, Eye Movement Measurements

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          Abstract

          Thirty-five healthy participants incidentally encoded a set of man-made and natural object pictures, while their pupil response and eye movements were recorded. At retrieval, studied and new stimuli were rated as novel, familiar (strong, moderate, or weak), or recollected. We found that both pupil response and fixation patterns at encoding predict later recognition memory strength. The extent of pupillary response accompanying incidental encoding was found to be predictive of subsequent memory. In addition, the number of fixations was also predictive of later recognition memory strength, suggesting that the accumulation of greater visual detail, even for single objects, is critical for the creation of a strong memory. Moreover, fixation patterns at encoding distinguished between recollection and familiarity at retrieval, with more dispersed fixations predicting familiarity and more clustered fixations predicting recollection. These data reveal close links between the autonomic control of pupil responses and eye movement patterns on the one hand and memory encoding on the other. Moreover, the data illustrate quantitative as well as qualitative differences in the incidental visual processing of stimuli, which are differentially predictive of the strength and the kind of memory experienced at recognition.

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          Journal
          10.1080/17470218.2011.588335
          21838656

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