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      Scaling relationships for the elastic moduli and viscosity of mixed lipid membranes

      , , , ,

      Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

      Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

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          Abstract

          The elastic and viscous properties of biological membranes play a vital role in controlling cell functions that require local reorganization of the membrane components as well as dramatic shape changes such as endocytosis, vesicular trafficking, and cell division. These properties are widely acknowledged to depend on the unique composition of lipids within the membrane, yet the effects of lipid mixing on the membrane biophysical properties remain poorly understood. Here, we present a comprehensive characterization of the structural, elastic, and viscous properties of fluid membranes composed of binary mixtures of lipids with different tail lengths. We show that the mixed lipid membrane properties are not simply additive quantities of the single-component analogs. Instead, the mixed membranes are more dynamic than either of their constituents, quantified as a decrease in their bending modulus, area compressibility modulus, and viscosity. While the enhanced dynamics are seemingly unexpected, we show that the measured moduli and viscosity for both the mixed and single-component bilayers all scale with the area per lipid and collapse onto respective master curves. This scaling links the increase in dynamics to mixing-induced changes in the lipid packing and membrane structure. More importantly, the results show that the membrane properties can be manipulated through lipid composition the same way bimodal blends of surfactants, liquid crystals, and polymers are used to engineer the mechanical properties of soft materials, with broad implications for understanding how lipid diversity relates to biomembrane function.

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          Most cited references 39

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          Mesoscopic undulations and thickness fluctuations in lipid bilayers from molecular dynamics simulations.

          Molecular dynamics simulations of fully hydrated Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers, extending temporal and spatial scales by almost one order of magnitude, are presented. The present work reaches system sizes of 1024 lipids and times 10-60 ns. The simulations uncover significant dynamics and fluctuations on scales of several nanoseconds, and enable direct observation and spectral decomposition of both undulatory and thickness fluctuation modes. Although the former modes are strongly damped, the latter exhibit signs of oscillatory behavior. From this, it has been possible to calculate mesoscopic continuum properties in good agreement with experimental values. A bending modulus of 4 x 10(-20) J, bilayer area compressibility of 250-300 mN/m, and mode relaxation times in the nanosecond range are obtained. The theory of undulatory motions is revised and further extended to cover thickness fluctuations. Finally, it is proposed that thickness fluctuations is the explanation to the observed system-size dependence of equilibrium-projected area per lipid.
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            Effect of Undulations on Surface Tension in Simulated Bilayers

             S. Marrink,  A. Mark (2001)
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              Interpreting membrane scattering experiments at the mesoscale: the contribution of dissipation within the bilayer.

              Neutron spin-echo spectroscopy provides a means to study membrane undulation dynamics over length scales roughly spanning 10-100 nanometers. Modern interpretation of these measurements relies on the theoretical predictions of Zilman and Granek; however, it is necessary to introduce an anomalously large solvent viscosity within this theory to obtain quantitative agreement with experiment. An extended theoretical treatment is presented that includes the effects of internal dissipation within the bilayer. Within the length and time regimes appropriate to neutron spin-echo experiments, the results of Zilman and Granek are largely recovered, except that the bilayer curvature modulus kappa appearing in their theory must be replaced with an effective dynamic curvature modulus kappa =kappa+2d(2)k(m), where d is a distance comparable to the monolayer thickness (the height of the neutral surface from bilayer midplane) and k(m) is the monolayer compressibility modulus. Direct comparison between theory and experiment becomes possible without any rescaling of physical parameters.
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                Author and article information

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                Journal
                Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
                Proc Natl Acad Sci USA
                Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
                0027-8424
                1091-6490
                September 22 2020
                September 22 2020
                September 22 2020
                September 03 2020
                : 117
                : 38
                : 23365-23373
                Article
                10.1073/pnas.2008789117
                7519290
                32883879
                © 2020

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