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Secukinumab in the treatment of psoriasis: patient selection and perspectives

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      Abstract

      Secukinumab is a human monoclonal antibody targeting IL-17A that has been approved for three indications: moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. In Phase III clinical trials for each of these three indications, secukinumab has proven to be both highly efficacious and well-tolerated. However, several biologic medications are currently approved for the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis, and many demonstrate excellent efficacy and safety. Due to this wide selection, it is often unclear how to choose biologics for specific patients. Important considerations in biologic selection include clinical efficacy, safety, cost, convenience, onset of action, and management of comorbid disease. This article aims to outline the key considerations in patient selection for the treatment of plaque psoriasis with secukinumab.

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      Most cited references 44

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      Secukinumab in plaque psoriasis--results of two phase 3 trials.

      Interleukin-17A is considered to be central to the pathogenesis of psoriasis. We evaluated secukinumab, a fully human anti-interleukin-17A monoclonal antibody, in patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. In two phase 3, double-blind, 52-week trials, ERASURE (Efficacy of Response and Safety of Two Fixed Secukinumab Regimens in Psoriasis) and FIXTURE (Full Year Investigative Examination of Secukinumab vs. Etanercept Using Two Dosing Regimens to Determine Efficacy in Psoriasis), we randomly assigned 738 patients (in the ERASURE study) and 1306 patients (in the FIXTURE study) to subcutaneous secukinumab at a dose of 300 mg or 150 mg (administered once weekly for 5 weeks, then every 4 weeks), placebo, or (in the FIXTURE study only) etanercept at a dose of 50 mg (administered twice weekly for 12 weeks, then once weekly). The objective of each study was to show the superiority of secukinumab over placebo at week 12 with respect to the proportion of patients who had a reduction of 75% or more from baseline in the psoriasis area-and-severity index score (PASI 75) and a score of 0 (clear) or 1 (almost clear) on a 5-point modified investigator's global assessment (coprimary end points). The proportion of patients who met the criterion for PASI 75 at week 12 was higher with each secukinumab dose than with placebo or etanercept: in the ERASURE study, the rates were 81.6% with 300 mg of secukinumab, 71.6% with 150 mg of secukinumab, and 4.5% with placebo; in the FIXTURE study, the rates were 77.1% with 300 mg of secukinumab, 67.0% with 150 mg of secukinumab, 44.0% with etanercept, and 4.9% with placebo (P<0.001 for each secukinumab dose vs. comparators). The proportion of patients with a response of 0 or 1 on the modified investigator's global assessment at week 12 was higher with each secukinumab dose than with placebo or etanercept: in the ERASURE study, the rates were 65.3% with 300 mg of secukinumab, 51.2% with 150 mg of secukinumab, and 2.4% with placebo; in the FIXTURE study, the rates were 62.5% with 300 mg of secukinumab, 51.1% with 150 mg of secukinumab, 27.2% with etanercept, and 2.8% with placebo (P<0.001 for each secukinumab dose vs. comparators). The rates of infection were higher with secukinumab than with placebo in both studies and were similar to those with etanercept. Secukinumab was effective for psoriasis in two randomized trials, validating interleukin-17A as a therapeutic target. (Funded by Novartis Pharmaceuticals; ERASURE and FIXTURE ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT01365455 and NCT01358578, respectively.).
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        Risk of myocardial infarction in patients with psoriasis.

        Psoriasis is the most common T-helper cell type 1 (T(H)1) immunological disease. Evidence has linked T(H)1 diseases to myocardial infarction (MI). Psoriasis has been associated with cardiovascular diseases, but has only been investigated in hospital-based studies that did not control for major cardiovascular risk factors. To determine if within a population-based cohort psoriasis is an independent risk factor for MI when controlling for major cardiovascular risk factors. A prospective, population-based cohort study in the United Kingdom of patients with psoriasis aged 20 to 90 years, comparing outcomes among patients with and without a diagnosis of psoriasis. Data were collected by general practitioners as part of the patient's medical record and stored in the General Practice Research Database between 1987 and 2002, with a mean follow-up of 5.4 years. Adjustments were made for hypertension, diabetes, history of myocardial infarction, hyperlipidemia, age, sex, smoking, and body mass index. Patients with psoriasis were classified as severe if they ever received a systemic therapy. Up to 5 controls without psoriasis were randomly selected from the same practices and start dates as the patients with psoriasis. A total of 556,995 control patients and patients with mild (n = 127,139) and severe psoriasis (n = 3837) were identified. Incident MI. There were 11,194 MIs (2.0%) within the control population and 2319 (1.8%) and 112 (2.9%) MIs within the mild and severe psoriasis groups, respectively. The incidences per 1000 person-years for control patients and patients with mild and severe psoriasis were 3.58 (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.52-3.65), 4.04 (95% CI, 3.88-4.21), and 5.13 (95% CI, 4.22-6.17), respectively. Patients with psoriasis had an increased adjusted relative risk (RR) for MI that varied by age. For example, for a 30-year-old patient with mild or severe psoriasis, the adjusted RR of having an MI is 1.29 (95% CI, 1.14-1.46) and 3.10 (95% CI, 1.98-4.86), respectively. For a 60-year-old patient with mild or severe psoriasis, the adjusted RR of having an MI is 1.08 (95% CI, 1.03-1.13) and 1.36 (95% CI, 1.13-1.64), respectively. Psoriasis may confer an independent risk of MI. The RR was greatest in young patients with severe psoriasis.
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          Psoriasis causes as much disability as other major medical diseases.

           D Reboussin,  M Exum,  S Rapp (1999)
          Little is known about how the health-related quality of life (HRQL) associated with psoriasis compares with that of other patient populations. We describe HRQL associated with psoriasis and compare it with HRQL of patients with other major chronic health conditions. A second aim is to identify which specific aspects of psoriasis contribute most to HRQL. A total of 317 patients completed a non-disease-specific measure of HRQL. Responses were compared with those of patients with 10 other chronic health conditions. HRQL was regressed on ratings of 18 aspects of psoriasis. Patients with psoriasis reported reduction in physical functioning and mental functioning comparable to that seen in cancer, arthritis, hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, and depression. Six aspects of psoriasis predicted physical functioning, and 5 different disease aspects predicted mental functioning. The impact of psoriasis on HRQL is similar to that of other major medical diseases. Different aspects of psoriasis are related to the different dimensions of HRQL supporting the need for multidimensional treatment models.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1 ]Department of Dermatology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA, ericjyang@ 123456outlook.com
            [2 ]Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL, USA, ericjyang@ 123456outlook.com
            Author notes
            Correspondence: Eric J Yang, Department of Dermatology, University of California San Francisco, 515 Spruce Street, San Francisco, CA 94118, USA, Tel +1 858 322 5414, Fax +1 415 502 4126, Email ericjyang@ 123456outlook.com
            Journal
            Psoriasis (Auckl)
            Psoriasis (Auckl)
            Psoriasis: Targets and Therapy
            Psoriasis: Targets and Therapy
            Dove Medical Press
            2230-326X
            2018
            17 October 2018
            : 8
            : 75-82
            6202001
            10.2147/PTT.S146004
            ptt-8-075
            © 2018 Yang et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

            The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed

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