1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Evolution of virulence in Enterococcus faecium, a hospital-adapted opportunistic pathogen.

      1 ,   2 ,   3
      Current opinion in microbiology
      Elsevier BV

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Enterococci are long-standing members of the human microbiome and they are also widely distributed in nature. However, with the surge of antibiotic-resistance in recent decades, two enterococcal species (Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium) have emerged to become significant nosocomial pathogens, acquiring extensive antibiotic resistance. In this review, we summarize what is known about the evolution of virulence in E. faecium, highlighting a specific clone of E. faecium called ST796 that has emerged recently and spread globally.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          Curr. Opin. Microbiol.
          Current opinion in microbiology
          Elsevier BV
          1879-0364
          1369-5274
          Feb 2018
          : 41
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia.
          [2 ] Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia; Microbiological Diagnostic Unit Public Health Laboratory, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia; Infectious Diseases Department, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria 3084, Australia.
          [3 ] Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia. Electronic address: tstinear@unimelb.edu.au.
          Article
          S1369-5274(17)30076-0
          10.1016/j.mib.2017.11.030
          29227922
          25766ee0-0e37-4812-94be-71ed1121b5fc
          History

          Comments

          Comment on this article