1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Genomic Analyses Implicate the Amazon–Orinoco Plume as the Driver of Cryptic Speciation in a Swimming Crab

      , , ,
      Genes
      MDPI AG

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The Amazon–Orinoco plume (AOP) is the world’s largest freshwater and sediment discharge into the ocean. Previous studies limited to mtDNA suggest that the swimming crab Callinectes ornatus Ordway, 1863 exists as two distinct genetic clusters separated by the AOP. However, questions concerning migration, diversification time, and species delimitation are unresolved. Densely sampling markers across the genome (SNPs) could elucidate the evolutionary processes within this species. Here, we combined mtDNA data and ddRAD-seq to explore the diversification patterns and processes within the swimming crab C. ornatus. We show great genetic differentiation between groups on the north and south sides of the plume but also signs of hybridization. Demographic modeling indicates the divergence between groups starting around 8 Mya following the AOP’s formation. After a period of isolation, we detect two incidences of secondary contact with stronger migration in concordance with the North Brazil Current flow. Our results suggest speciation with gene flow explained by the interplay among the AOP, oceanographic currents, and long larval dispersal. This work represents the first investigation employing ddRAD-seq in a marine invertebrate species with distribution encompassing the north and south Atlantic and sheds light on the role of the AOP in the diversification of a marine species.

          Related collections

          Most cited references99

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          The Sequence Alignment/Map format and SAMtools

          Summary: The Sequence Alignment/Map (SAM) format is a generic alignment format for storing read alignments against reference sequences, supporting short and long reads (up to 128 Mbp) produced by different sequencing platforms. It is flexible in style, compact in size, efficient in random access and is the format in which alignments from the 1000 Genomes Project are released. SAMtools implements various utilities for post-processing alignments in the SAM format, such as indexing, variant caller and alignment viewer, and thus provides universal tools for processing read alignments. Availability: http://samtools.sourceforge.net Contact: rd@sanger.ac.uk
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: found
            Is Open Access

            Fast and accurate short read alignment with Burrows–Wheeler transform

            Motivation: The enormous amount of short reads generated by the new DNA sequencing technologies call for the development of fast and accurate read alignment programs. A first generation of hash table-based methods has been developed, including MAQ, which is accurate, feature rich and fast enough to align short reads from a single individual. However, MAQ does not support gapped alignment for single-end reads, which makes it unsuitable for alignment of longer reads where indels may occur frequently. The speed of MAQ is also a concern when the alignment is scaled up to the resequencing of hundreds of individuals. Results: We implemented Burrows-Wheeler Alignment tool (BWA), a new read alignment package that is based on backward search with Burrows–Wheeler Transform (BWT), to efficiently align short sequencing reads against a large reference sequence such as the human genome, allowing mismatches and gaps. BWA supports both base space reads, e.g. from Illumina sequencing machines, and color space reads from AB SOLiD machines. Evaluations on both simulated and real data suggest that BWA is ∼10–20× faster than MAQ, while achieving similar accuracy. In addition, BWA outputs alignment in the new standard SAM (Sequence Alignment/Map) format. Variant calling and other downstream analyses after the alignment can be achieved with the open source SAMtools software package. Availability: http://maq.sourceforge.net Contact: rd@sanger.ac.uk
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: found
              Is Open Access

              MAFFT Multiple Sequence Alignment Software Version 7: Improvements in Performance and Usability

              We report a major update of the MAFFT multiple sequence alignment program. This version has several new features, including options for adding unaligned sequences into an existing alignment, adjustment of direction in nucleotide alignment, constrained alignment and parallel processing, which were implemented after the previous major update. This report shows actual examples to explain how these features work, alone and in combination. Some examples incorrectly aligned by MAFFT are also shown to clarify its limitations. We discuss how to avoid misalignments, and our ongoing efforts to overcome such limitations.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                GENEG9
                Genes
                Genes
                MDPI AG
                2073-4425
                December 2022
                December 01 2022
                : 13
                : 12
                : 2263
                Article
                10.3390/genes13122263
                26179f20-878f-44a1-9ef8-9428d250c0ed
                © 2022

                https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article