Blog
About

4
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      An index of forest management intensity based on assessment of harvested tree volume, tree species composition and dead wood origin

      ,

      Nature Conservation

      Pensoft Publishers

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Forest management intensity often affects biodiversity, ecosystem processes and ecosystem services. To assess the influence of past management intensity on current ecosystem properties, management intensity must be quantified in a meaningful and reproducible approach. Here we developed the simple yet effective Forest Management Intensity index (ForMI), which is based only on inventory data of the living stand, stumps and dead wood. The ForMI is the sum of three components taking into account: 1. the proportion of harvested tree volume (Iharv), 2. the proportion of tree species that are not part of the natural forest community (Inonat) and 3. the proportion of dead wood showing signs of saw cuts (Idwcut). Each component ranges between 0 (no sign of management) and 1 (intensive management). Our analysis suggests that the ForMI can be used to assess management intensity in Central European forests for the last 30 to 40 years, depending on decay rates of stumps and dead wood. Our approach was tested using data of 148 forest plots of 1 ha in size in Germany. We found a significant distinction between plots that were previously described as managed and unmanaged as well as between plots comprising trees species of the natural forest community and those with additional, introduced coniferous tree species. We conclude that the index is applicable to a wide range of forest management types, but should not be misinterpreted as an index for old-growth structure.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 24

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Book Chapter: not found

          Ecology of Coarse Woody Debris in Temperate Ecosystems

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Carbon allocation in forest ecosystems

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Implementing large-scale and long-term functional biodiversity research: The Biodiversity Exploratories

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature Conservation
                NC
                Pensoft Publishers
                1314-3301
                1314-6947
                April 09 2014
                April 09 2014
                : 7
                : 15-27
                Article
                10.3897/natureconservation.7.7281
                © 2014

                http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Comments

                Comment on this article