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      CNS Response to Osimertinib Versus Standard Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Patients With Untreated EGFR-Mutated Advanced Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

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          Abstract

          Purpose We report CNS efficacy of osimertinib versus standard epidermal growth factor receptor ( EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in patients with untreated EGFR-mutated advanced non-small-cell lung cancer from the phase III FLAURA study. Patients and Methods Patients (N = 556) were randomly assigned to osimertinib or standard EGFR-TKIs (gefitinib or erlotinib); brain scans were not mandated unless clinically indicated. Patients with asymptomatic or stable CNS metastases were included. In patients with symptomatic CNS metastases, neurologic status was required to be stable for ≥ 2 weeks after completion of definitive therapy and corticosteroids. A preplanned subgroup analysis with CNS progression-free survival as primary objective was conducted in patients with measurable and/or nonmeasurable CNS lesions on baseline brain scan by blinded independent central neuroradiologic review. The CNS evaluable-for-response set included patients with ≥ one measurable CNS lesion. Results Of 200 patients with available brain scans at baseline, 128 (osimertinib, n = 61; standard EGFR-TKIs, n = 67) had measurable and/or nonmeasurable CNS lesions, including 41 patients (osimertinib, n = 22; standard EGFR-TKIs, n = 19) with ≥ one measurable CNS lesion. Median CNS progression-free survival in patients with measurable and/or nonmeasurable CNS lesions was not reached with osimertinib (95% CI, 16.5 months to not calculable) and 13.9 months (95% CI, 8.3 months to not calculable) with standard EGFR-TKIs (hazard ratio, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.26 to 0.86; P = .014 [nominally statistically significant]). CNS objective response rates were 91% and 68% in patients with ≥ one measurable CNS lesion (odds ratio, 4.6; 95% CI, 0.9 to 34.9; P = .066) and 66% and 43% in patients with measurable and/or nonmeasurable CNS lesions (odds ratio, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.2 to 5.2; P = .011) treated with osimertinib and standard EGFR-TKIs, respectively. Probability of experiencing a CNS progression event was consistently lower with osimertinib versus standard EGFR-TKIs. Conclusion Osimertinib has CNS efficacy in patients with untreated EGFR-mutated non-small-cell lung cancer. These results suggest a reduced risk of CNS progression with osimertinib versus standard EGFR-TKIs.

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          Most cited references15

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          Preclinical Comparison of Osimertinib with Other EGFR-TKIs in EGFR-Mutant NSCLC Brain Metastases Models, and Early Evidence of Clinical Brain Metastases Activity.

          Approximately one-third of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring tumors with EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-sensitizing mutations (EGFRm) experience disease progression during treatment due to brain metastases. Despite anecdotal reports of EGFR-TKIs providing benefit in some patients with EGFRm NSCLC brain metastases, there is a clinical need for novel EGFR-TKIs with improved efficacy against brain lesions.
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            Dexamethasone and supportive care with or without whole brain radiotherapy in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer with brain metastases unsuitable for resection or stereotactic radiotherapy (QUARTZ): results from a phase 3, non-inferiority, randomised trial

            Summary Background Whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and dexamethasone are widely used to treat brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), although there have been no randomised clinical trials showing that WBRT improves either quality of life or overall survival. Even after treatment with WBRT, the prognosis of this patient group is poor. We aimed to establish whether WBRT could be omitted without a significant effect on survival or quality of life. Methods The Quality of Life after Treatment for Brain Metastases (QUARTZ) study is a non-inferiority, phase 3 randomised trial done at 69 UK and three Australian centres. NSCLC patients with brain metastases unsuitable for surgical resection or stereotactic radiotherapy were randomly assigned (1:1) to optimal supportive care (OSC) including dexamethasone plus WBRT (20 Gy in five daily fractions) or OSC alone (including dexamethasone). The dose of dexamethasone was determined by the patients' symptoms and titrated downwards if symptoms improved. Allocation to treatment group was done by a phone call from the hospital to the Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit at University College London using a minimisation programme with a random element and stratification by centre, Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS), gender, status of brain metastases, and the status of primary lung cancer. The primary outcome measure was quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). QALYs were generated from overall survival and patients' weekly completion of the EQ-5D questionnaire. Treatment with OSC alone was considered non-inferior if it was no more than 7 QALY days worse than treatment with WBRT plus OSC, which required 534 patients (80% power, 5% [one-sided] significance level). Analysis was done by intention to treat for all randomly assigned patients. The trial is registered with ISRCTN, number ISRCTN3826061. Findings Between March 2, 2007, and Aug 29, 2014, 538 patients were recruited from 69 UK and three Australian centres, and were randomly assigned to receive either OSC plus WBRT (269) or OSC alone (269). Baseline characteristics were balanced between groups, and the median age of participants was 66 years (range 38–85). Significantly more episodes of drowsiness, hair loss, nausea, and dry or itchy scalp were reported while patients were receiving WBRT, although there was no evidence of a difference in the rate of serious adverse events between the two groups. There was no evidence of a difference in overall survival (hazard ratio 1·06, 95% CI 0·90–1·26), overall quality of life, or dexamethasone use between the two groups. The difference between the mean QALYs was 4·7 days (46·4 QALY days for the OSC plus WBRT group vs 41·7 QALY days for the OSC group), with two-sided 90% CI of −12·7 to 3·3. Interpretation Although the primary outcome measure result includes the prespecified non-inferiority margin, the combination of the small difference in QALYs and the absence of a difference in survival and quality of life between the two groups suggests that WBRT provides little additional clinically significant benefit for this patient group. Funding Cancer Research UK, Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit at University College London, and the National Health and Medical Research Council in Australia.
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              Brain metastases in patients with EGFR-mutated or ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancers.

              Brain metastases (BM) are common in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the baseline incidence and evolution of BM over time in oncogene-driven NSCLCs are seldom reported. In this study, we evaluated the frequency of BM in patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutated or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-rearranged NSCLC.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Clinical Oncology
                JCO
                American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)
                0732-183X
                1527-7755
                August 28 2018
                August 28 2018
                : JCO.2018.78.311
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Thanyanan Reungwetwattana, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; Kazuhiko Nakagawa, Kindai University School of Medicine, Osaka; Naoyuki Nogami, National Hospital Organization Shikoku Cancer Center, Matsuyama; Isamu Okamoto, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan; Byoung Chul Cho, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul; Eun Kyung Cho, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon; Ki Hyeong Lee, Chungbuk National...
                Article
                10.1200/JCO.2018.78.3118
                30153097
                2621dad6-1583-45b7-b51b-27fd70b2be24
                © 2018
                History

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