1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Adult chronic rhinosinusitis: surgical outcomes and the role of endoscopic sinus surgery :

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 14

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Evaluation of the medical and surgical treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis: a prospective, randomised, controlled trial.

          To conduct the first prospective, randomized, controlled trial evaluating and comparing the medical and surgical treatment of polypoid and nonpolypoid chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Ninety patients with CRS were equally randomized either to medical or surgical therapy. All patients underwent pre- and posttreatment assessments of visual analogue score (VAS), the Sinonasal Outcome Test-20 (SNOT-20), the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36), nitric oxide (NO), acoustic rhinometry, saccharine clearance time (SCT), and nasal endoscopy. Each patient had three assessments: before starting the treatment, after 6 months, and, finally, after 1 year. Both the medical and surgical treatment of CRS significantly improved almost all the subjective and objective parameters of CRS (P .05), except for the total nasal volume in CRS (P <.01) and CRS without polyposis (P <.01) groups, in which the surgical treatment demonstrated greater changes. CRS should be initially targeted with maximal medical therapy (e.g., a 3 month course of a macrolide antibiotic, douche, and topical steroid), with surgical treatment being reserved for cases refractory to medical therapy. The presence of nasal polyps is not a poor prognostic factor for the efficacy of CRS therapy, either surgical or medical.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Predictive factors and outcomes in endoscopic sinus surgery for chronic rhinosinusitis.

            To assess objective and quality of life (QOL) outcomes before and after endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and to determine preoperative factors that predict surgical outcome in these patients. One hundred nineteen adult patients with CRS and a mean follow-up of 1.4 +/- 0.35 years were evaluated prospectively including the following patient factors: prior sinus surgery, polyps, asthma, acetylsalicylic acid intolerance (ASA), smoking, allergy, depression, and sex. Computed tomography (CT), endoscopy, and QOL assessment was performed. Predictive value of patient factors was determined based on change in endoscopy and QOL scores after ESS. Objective outcomes: preoperative CT scores were significantly worse in patients with polyps, asthma, and ASA, whereas CT score was unaffected by prior sinus surgery, smoking, allergy, depression, and sex. Patients with CRS demonstrated significant improvement on nasal endoscopy after ESS, but preoperative, postoperative, and change in scores were affected by certain patient factors. Endoscopy scores were significantly worse in patients with prior sinus surgery, polyps, asthma, and ASA, but these patients also experienced the greatest improvement in endoscopy scores. Smokers and patients with depression had the least change in endoscopy scores. QOL outcomes: patients with CRS experienced improvement in QOL after ESS. Pre- and postoperative QOL was positively affected by polyps and adversely affected by ASA, depression, and female sex, but these groups still experienced significant improvement in QOL scores. Pre- and postoperative QOL was unaffected by prior sinus surgery, asthma, smoking, and allergies, and all of these groups experienced significant improvement in QOL scores. Factors predictive of outcome: ASA and depression were predictive of worse outcome. Preoperative CT scores approached significance as being predictive of outcome. Surgical management of CRS was associated with significant improvement on objective and QOL measures; however, specific patient factors, in particular ASA and depression, predict poorer outcome. Preoperative CT may be a predictor of endoscopic and QOL outcome and deserves further study.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Long-term results of functional endoscopic sinus surgery.

              Although much has been reported on the short-term outcomes of functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS), little has been reported with regard to its long-term impact on chronic sinusitis. The senior author (D.W.K.) previously reported detailed subjective and endoscopic follow-up on 120 patients at a mean of 18 months following surgery. This current study represents a long-term follow-up (average, 7.8 years) of 72 patients (60%) from the same cohort. Of patients responding to a question about overall symptoms, 98.4% (n = 66) reported improvement compared with before surgery. There was a trend toward continued subjective improvement in symptom scores with longer follow-up, but the changes did not reach statistical significance. Thirteen patients (18%) required subsequent surgical procedures. Preoperative stage, prior surgery, and other factors that might affect outcome were evaluated. The study demonstrates that excellent subjective results following FESS can be maintained in the long term with appropriate postoperative management. The study also validates the concept that patients in whom the cavity can be normalized following surgery are unlikely to require further surgery.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Current Opinion in Otolaryngology & Head and Neck Surgery
                Current Opinion in Otolaryngology & Head and Neck Surgery
                Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)
                1068-9508
                2007
                February 2007
                : 15
                : 1
                : 6-9
                Article
                10.1097/MOO.0b013e328011bc8c
                © 2007

                Comments

                Comment on this article