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      Shelf-derived mass-transport deposits: origin and significance in the stratigraphic development of trench-slope basins

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          Chronology of fluctuating sea levels since the triassic.

          Advances in sequence stratigraphy and the development of depositional models have helped explain the origin of genetically related sedimentary packages during sea level cycles. These concepts have provided the basis for the recognition of sea level events in subsurface data and in outcrops of marine sediments around the world. Knowledge of these events has led to a new generation of Mesozoic and Cenozoic global cycle charts that chronicle the history of sea level fluctuations during the past 250 million years in greater detail than was possible from seismic-stratigraphic data alone. An effort has been made to develop a realistic and accurate time scale and widely applicable chronostratigraphy and to integrate depositional sequences documented in public domain outcrop sections from various basins with this chronostratigraphic framework. A description of this approach and an account of the results, illustrated by sea level cycle charts of the Cenozoic, Cretaceous, Jurassic, and Triassic intervals, are presented.
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            The Phanerozoic record of global sea-level change.

            K. Miller (2005)
            We review Phanerozoic sea-level changes [543 million years ago (Ma) to the present] on various time scales and present a new sea-level record for the past 100 million years (My). Long-term sea level peaked at 100 +/- 50 meters during the Cretaceous, implying that ocean-crust production rates were much lower than previously inferred. Sea level mirrors oxygen isotope variations, reflecting ice-volume change on the 10(4)- to 10(6)-year scale, but a link between oxygen isotope and sea level on the 10(7)-year scale must be due to temperature changes that we attribute to tectonically controlled carbon dioxide variations. Sea-level change has influenced phytoplankton evolution, ocean chemistry, and the loci of carbonate, organic carbon, and siliciclastic sediment burial. Over the past 100 My, sea-level changes reflect global climate evolution from a time of ephemeral Antarctic ice sheets (100 to 33 Ma), through a time of large ice sheets primarily in Antarctica (33 to 2.5 Ma), to a world with large Antarctic and large, variable Northern Hemisphere ice sheets (2.5 Ma to the present).
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              ‘Structure-from-Motion’ photogrammetry: A low-cost, effective tool for geoscience applications

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                New Zealand Journal of Geology and Geophysics
                New Zealand Journal of Geology and Geophysics
                Informa UK Limited
                0028-8306
                1175-8791
                January 02 2022
                May 27 2021
                January 02 2022
                : 65
                : 1
                : 17-52
                Affiliations
                [1 ]U2R 7511, Basins-Reservoirs-Resources (B2R), Geosciences Department, UniLaSalle – University of Picardie Jules Verne, Beauvais, France
                [2 ]Schlumberger, Software Integrated Solutions, London, UK
                [3 ]University of Lille, CNRS, ULCO, UMR 8187, Laboratory of Oceanology and Geosciences (LOG), Lille, France
                [4 ]U2R 7511, Basins-Reservoirs-Resources (B2R), University of Picardie Jules Verne – UniLaSalle, Amiens, France
                [5 ]School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
                [6 ]GNS Science, Lower Hutt, New Zealand
                Article
                10.1080/00288306.2021.1918729
                26251941-7fb5-4b3a-9dd0-64070bed4877
                © 2022
                History

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