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      The human skin microbiome

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      Nature Reviews Microbiology

      Springer Nature

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          Microbiota-mediated colonization resistance against intestinal pathogens.

          Commensal bacteria inhabit mucosal and epidermal surfaces in mice and humans, and have effects on metabolic and immune pathways in their hosts. Recent studies indicate that the commensal microbiota can be manipulated to prevent and even to cure infections that are caused by pathogenic bacteria, particularly pathogens that are broadly resistant to antibiotics, such as vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, Gram-negative Enterobacteriaceae and Clostridium difficile. In this Review, we discuss how immune- mediated colonization resistance against antibiotic-resistant intestinal pathogens is influenced by the composition of the commensal microbiota. We also review recent advances characterizing the ability of different commensal bacterial families, genera and species to restore colonization resistance to intestinal pathogens in antibiotic-treated hosts.
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            Community-associated meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

            Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is endemic in hospitals worldwide, and causes substantial morbidity and mortality. Health-care-associated MRSA infections arise in individuals with predisposing risk factors, such as surgery or presence of an indwelling medical device. By contrast, many community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) infections arise in otherwise healthy individuals who do not have such risk factors. Additionally, CA-MRSA infections are epidemic in some countries. These features suggest that CA-MRSA strains are more virulent and transmissible than are traditional hospital-associated MRSA strains. The restricted treatment options for CA-MRSA infections compound the effect of enhanced virulence and transmission. Although progress has been made towards understanding emergence of CA-MRSA, virulence, and treatment of infections, our knowledge remains incomplete. Here we review the most up-to-date knowledge and provide a perspective for the future prophylaxis or new treatments for CA-MRSA infections. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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              Human commensals producing a novel antibiotic impair pathogen colonization.

              The vast majority of systemic bacterial infections are caused by facultative, often antibiotic-resistant, pathogens colonizing human body surfaces. Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus predisposes to invasive infection, but the mechanisms that permit or interfere with pathogen colonization are largely unknown. Whereas soil microbes are known to compete by production of antibiotics, such processes have rarely been reported for human microbiota. We show that nasal Staphylococcus lugdunensis strains produce lugdunin, a novel thiazolidine-containing cyclic peptide antibiotic that prohibits colonization by S. aureus, and a rare example of a non-ribosomally synthesized bioactive compound from human-associated bacteria. Lugdunin is bactericidal against major pathogens, effective in animal models, and not prone to causing development of resistance in S. aureus. Notably, human nasal colonization by S. lugdunensis was associated with a significantly reduced S. aureus carriage rate, suggesting that lugdunin or lugdunin-producing commensal bacteria could be valuable for preventing staphylococcal infections. Moreover, human microbiota should be considered as a source for new antibiotics.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature Reviews Microbiology
                Nat Rev Micro
                Springer Nature
                1740-1526
                1740-1534
                January 15 2018
                January 15 2018
                :
                :
                Article
                10.1038/nrmicro.2017.157
                26a1e4da-72a0-4ece-83de-2127b688617c
                © 2018

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