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      Generating online social networks based on socio-demographic attributes

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          Abstract

          Recent years have seen tremendous growth of many online social networks such as Facebook, LinkedIn and MySpace. People connect to each other through these networks forming large social communities providing researchers rich datasets to understand, model and predict social interactions and behaviors. New contacts in these networks can be formed due to an individual's demographic attributes such as age group, gender, geographic location, or due to a network's structural dynamics such as triadic closure and preferential attachment, or a combination of both demographic and structural characteristics. A number of network generation models have been proposed in the last decade to explain the structure, evolution and processes taking place in different types of networks, and notably social networks. Network generation models studied in the literature primarily consider structural properties, and in some cases an individual's demographic profile in the formation of new social contacts. These models do not present a mechanism to combine both structural and demographic characteristics for the formation of new links. In this paper, we propose a new network generation algorithm which incorporates both these characteristics to model network formation. We use different publicly available Facebook datasets as benchmarks to demonstrate the correctness of the proposed network generation model. The proposed model is flexible and thus can generate networks with varying demographic and structural properties.

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          Most cited references 12

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          The structure and function of complex networks

           M. Newman (2003)
          Inspired by empirical studies of networked systems such as the Internet, social networks, and biological networks, researchers have in recent years developed a variety of techniques and models to help us understand or predict the behavior of these systems. Here we review developments in this field, including such concepts as the small-world effect, degree distributions, clustering, network correlations, random graph models, models of network growth and preferential attachment, and dynamical processes taking place on networks.
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            Evolution of networks

             ,   (2001)
            We review the recent fast progress in statistical physics of evolving networks. Interest has focused mainly on the structural properties of random complex networks in communications, biology, social sciences and economics. A number of giant artificial networks of such a kind came into existence recently. This opens a wide field for the study of their topology, evolution, and complex processes occurring in them. Such networks possess a rich set of scaling properties. A number of them are scale-free and show striking resilience against random breakdowns. In spite of large sizes of these networks, the distances between most their vertices are short -- a feature known as the ``small-world'' effect. We discuss how growing networks self-organize into scale-free structures and the role of the mechanism of preferential linking. We consider the topological and structural properties of evolving networks, and percolation in these networks. We present a number of models demonstrating the main features of evolving networks and discuss current approaches for their simulation and analytical study. Applications of the general results to particular networks in Nature are discussed. We demonstrate the generic connections of the network growth processes with the general problems of non-equilibrium physics, econophysics, evolutionary biology, etc.
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              An introduction to exponential random graph (p*) models for social networks

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                2017-02-05
                Article
                1702.01434

                http://arxiv.org/licenses/nonexclusive-distrib/1.0/

                Custom metadata
                J Complex Netw 2014, 2 (4): 475-494
                arXiv admin note: substantial text overlap with arXiv:1311.3508
                cs.SI physics.soc-ph

                Social & Information networks, General physics

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