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      Activating ESR1 mutations in hormone-resistant metastatic breast cancer

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          Abstract

          Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer in women, and over two-thirds of cases express estrogen receptor-α (ER-α, encoded by ESR1). Through a prospective clinical sequencing program for advanced cancers, we enrolled 11 patients with ER-positive metastatic breast cancer. Whole-exome and transcriptome analysis showed that six cases harbored mutations of ESR1 affecting its ligand-binding domain (LBD), all of whom had been treated with anti-estrogens and estrogen deprivation therapies. A survey of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) identified four endometrial cancers with similar mutations of ESR1. The five new LBD-localized ESR1 mutations identified here (encoding p.Leu536Gln, p.Tyr537Ser, p.Tyr537Cys, p.Tyr537Asn and p.Asp538Gly) were shown to result in constitutive activity and continued responsiveness to anti-estrogen therapies in vitro. Taken together, these studies suggest that activating mutations in ESR1 are a key mechanism in acquired endocrine resistance in breast cancer therapy.

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          Most cited references 40

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          The Sequence Alignment/Map format and SAMtools

          Summary: The Sequence Alignment/Map (SAM) format is a generic alignment format for storing read alignments against reference sequences, supporting short and long reads (up to 128 Mbp) produced by different sequencing platforms. It is flexible in style, compact in size, efficient in random access and is the format in which alignments from the 1000 Genomes Project are released. SAMtools implements various utilities for post-processing alignments in the SAM format, such as indexing, variant caller and alignment viewer, and thus provides universal tools for processing read alignments. Availability: http://samtools.sourceforge.net Contact: rd@sanger.ac.uk
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            Differential gene and transcript expression analysis of RNA-seq experiments with TopHat and Cufflinks.

            Recent advances in high-throughput cDNA sequencing (RNA-seq) can reveal new genes and splice variants and quantify expression genome-wide in a single assay. The volume and complexity of data from RNA-seq experiments necessitate scalable, fast and mathematically principled analysis software. TopHat and Cufflinks are free, open-source software tools for gene discovery and comprehensive expression analysis of high-throughput mRNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data. Together, they allow biologists to identify new genes and new splice variants of known ones, as well as compare gene and transcript expression under two or more conditions. This protocol describes in detail how to use TopHat and Cufflinks to perform such analyses. It also covers several accessory tools and utilities that aid in managing data, including CummeRbund, a tool for visualizing RNA-seq analysis results. Although the procedure assumes basic informatics skills, these tools assume little to no background with RNA-seq analysis and are meant for novices and experts alike. The protocol begins with raw sequencing reads and produces a transcriptome assembly, lists of differentially expressed and regulated genes and transcripts, and publication-quality visualizations of analysis results. The protocol's execution time depends on the volume of transcriptome sequencing data and available computing resources but takes less than 1 d of computer time for typical experiments and ∼1 h of hands-on time.
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              Comprehensive molecular portraits of human breast tumors

              Summary We analyzed primary breast cancers by genomic DNA copy number arrays, DNA methylation, exome sequencing, mRNA arrays, microRNA sequencing and reverse phase protein arrays. Our ability to integrate information across platforms provided key insights into previously-defined gene expression subtypes and demonstrated the existence of four main breast cancer classes when combining data from five platforms, each of which shows significant molecular heterogeneity. Somatic mutations in only three genes (TP53, PIK3CA and GATA3) occurred at > 10% incidence across all breast cancers; however, there were numerous subtype-associated and novel gene mutations including the enrichment of specific mutations in GATA3, PIK3CA and MAP3K1 with the Luminal A subtype. We identified two novel protein expression-defined subgroups, possibly contributed by stromal/microenvironmental elements, and integrated analyses identified specific signaling pathways dominant in each molecular subtype including a HER2/p-HER2/HER1/p-HER1 signature within the HER2-Enriched expression subtype. Comparison of Basal-like breast tumors with high-grade Serous Ovarian tumors showed many molecular commonalities, suggesting a related etiology and similar therapeutic opportunities. The biologic finding of the four main breast cancer subtypes caused by different subsets of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities raises the hypothesis that much of the clinically observable plasticity and heterogeneity occurs within, and not across, these major biologic subtypes of breast cancer.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature Genetics
                Nat Genet
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                1061-4036
                1546-1718
                December 2013
                November 3 2013
                December 2013
                : 45
                : 12
                : 1446-1451
                Article
                10.1038/ng.2823
                4009946
                24185510
                © 2013

                http://www.springer.com/tdm

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