3
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      Training peers to treat Ebola centre workers with anxiety and depression in Sierra Leone

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Following the 2014 Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in West Africa, the UK Department for International Development funded South London and Maudsley National Health Service (NHS) to develop a psychological intervention that ex-Ebola Treatment Centre (ETC) staff could be trained to deliver to their peers to improve mental health in Sierra Leone.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 23

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          Prevalence of psychological symptoms among Ebola survivors and healthcare workers during the 2014-2015 Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone: a cross-sectional study

          The 2014–2015 Ebola epidemic was considered to be the largest and most complex outbreak, which caused 11,310 reported deaths. The epidemic disease can cause a mental health crisis, however, there is only a small amount of scientific literature available related to this health issue so far. We evaluated the psychological symptoms of 161 participants including Ebola survivors and healthcare workers in Sierra Leone, analyzed the impact of job classification, education level on psychological status. We found that the order of total general severity index (GSI) scores from high to low was EVD survivors, SL medical staff, SL logistic staff, SL medical students, and Chinese medical staff. There were 5 dimensions (obsession-compulsion, anxiety, hostility, phobic anxiety, and paranoid ideation) extremely high in EVD survivors. GSI were associated with university education negatively. We believed our information is necessary to develop the comprehensive emergency response plan for emerging infectious disease outbreak.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Validation of the alcohol use disorders identification test (audit) as a screening tool for alcohol-related problems among Nigerian university students.

            To investigate the screening properties of the alcohol use disorders identification test (AUDIT) in the detection of alcohol-related problems among Nigerian university students. Eight hundred and ten students completed the AUDIT. A percentage of them were assessed for alcohol-related diagnosis with structured clinical interview. The AUDIT at cut-off of 5 and above could clearly identify participants with alcohol-related problems with sensitivity of 0.935 and specificity of 0.915. The AUDIT is a valid instrument for screening for alcohol-related problems in Nigerian university students.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: found
              Is Open Access

              Associations between Mental Health and Ebola-Related Health Behaviors: A Regionally Representative Cross-sectional Survey in Post-conflict Sierra Leone

              Background Little attention has been paid to potential relationships between mental health, trauma, and personal exposures to Ebola virus disease (EVD) and health behaviors in post-conflict West Africa. We tested a conceptual model linking mental health and trauma to EVD risk behaviors and EVD prevention behaviors. Methods and Findings Using survey data from a representative sample in the Western Urban and Western Rural districts of Sierra Leone, this study examines associations between war exposures, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, depression, anxiety, and personal EVD exposure (e.g., having family members or friends diagnosed with EVD) and EVD-related health behaviors among 1,008 adults (98% response rate) from 63 census enumeration areas of the Western Rural and Western Urban districts randomly sampled at the height of the EVD epidemic (January–April 2015). Primary outcomes were EVD risk behaviors (14 items, Cronbach’s α = 0.84) and EVD prevention behaviors (16 items, Cronbach’s α = 0.88). Main predictors comprised war exposures (8 items, Cronbach’s α = 0.85), anxiety (10 items, Cronbach’s α = 0.93), depression (15 items, Cronbach’s α = 0.91), and PTSD symptoms (16 items, Cronbach’s α = 0.93). Data were analyzed using two-level, population-weighted hierarchical linear models with 20 multiply imputed datasets. EVD risk behaviors were associated with intensity of depression symptoms (b = 0.05; 95% CI 0.00, 0.10; p = 0.037), PTSD symptoms (b = 0.10; 95% CI 0.03, 0.17; p = 0.008), having a friend diagnosed with EVD (b = −0.04; 95% CI −0.08, −0.00; p = 0.036), and war exposures (b = −0.09; 95% CI −0.17, −0.02; p = 0.013). EVD prevention behaviors were associated with higher anxiety (b = 0.23; 95% CI 0.06, 0.40; p = 0.008), having a friend diagnosed with EVD (b = 0.15; 95% CI 0.04, 0.27; p = 0.011), and higher levels of war exposure (b = 0.45; 95% CI 0.16, 0.74; p = 0.003), independent of mental health. PTSD symptoms were associated with lower levels of EVD prevention behavior (b = −0.24; 95% CI −0.43, −0.06; p = 0.009). Conclusions In post-conflict settings, past war trauma and mental health problems are associated with health behaviors related to combatting EVD. The associations between war trauma and both EVD risk behaviors and EVD prevention behaviors may be mediated through two key mental health variables: depression and PTSD symptoms. Considering the role of mental health in the prevention of disease transmission may help fight continuing and future Ebola outbreaks in post-conflict Sierra Leone. This sample is specific to Freetown and the Western Area and may not be representative of all of Sierra Leone. In addition, our main outcomes as well as personal EVD exposure, war exposures, and mental health predictors rely on self-report, and therefore raise the possibility of common methods bias. However, the findings of this study may be relevant for understanding dynamics related to EVD and mental health in other major capital cities in the EVD-affected countries of West Africa.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                International Journal of Social Psychiatry
                Int J Soc Psychiatry
                SAGE Publications
                0020-7640
                1741-2854
                January 09 2018
                March 2018
                February 12 2018
                March 2018
                : 64
                : 2
                : 156-165
                Affiliations
                [1 ]South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK
                [2 ]Division of Psychiatry, University College London, London, UK
                [3 ]Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, UK
                Article
                10.1177/0020764017752021
                29432085
                © 2018

                Comments

                Comment on this article