7
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Neutralisation of SARS-CoV-2 lineage P.1 by antibodies elicited through natural SARS-CoV-2 infection or vaccination with an inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine: an immunological study

      research-article

      , PhD a , * , , MSc b , * , , PhD f , g , * , , MSc f , , BSc c , , MSc b , , MSc b , , MSc b , , BSc b , , MSc b , , BSc b , , PhD b , , BSc b , , BSc k , l , , PhD g , , BSc k , , MSc g , , MSc g , , BSc d , , BSc n , , BSc k , l , , BSc h , , PhD k , , MSc p , , DPhil p , , PhD k , , BSc k , , PhD k , , BSc h , k , q , , BSc k , , BSc k , , BSc k , , BSc k , m , , PhD r , , PhD n , , BSc k , l , , PhD s , , BSc u , , PhD t , v , , Prof, PhD t , , PhD w , , Prof, PhD e , , PhD h , , PhD h , , PhD d , , PhD i , j , o , , PhD x , , DPhil p , , PhD n , , PhD f , , PhD c , i , j , , Prof, PhD y , , DPhil k , p , z , , , Prof, PhD k , l , , , PhD b , aa , , , PhD b , i , , *

      The Lancet. Microbe

      The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background

          Mutations accrued by SARS-CoV-2 lineage P.1—first detected in Brazil in early January, 2021—include amino acid changes in the receptor-binding domain of the viral spike protein that also are reported in other variants of concern, including B.1.1.7 and B.1.351. We aimed to investigate whether isolates of wild-type P.1 lineage SARS-CoV-2 can escape from neutralising antibodies generated by a polyclonal immune response.

          Methods

          We did an immunological study to assess the neutralising effects of antibodies on lineage P.1 and lineage B isolates of SARS-CoV-2, using plasma samples from patients previously infected with or vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2. Two specimens (P.1/28 and P.1/30) containing SARS-CoV-2 lineage P.1 (as confirmed by viral genome sequencing) were obtained from nasopharyngeal and bronchoalveolar lavage samples collected from patients in Manaus, Brazil, and compared against an isolate of SARS-CoV-2 lineage B (SARS.CoV2/SP02.2020) recovered from a patient in Brazil in February, 2020. Isolates were incubated with plasma samples from 21 blood donors who had previously had COVID-19 and from a total of 53 recipients of the chemically inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine CoronaVac: 18 individuals after receipt of a single dose and an additional 20 individuals (38 in total) after receipt of two doses (collected 17–38 days after the most recent dose); and 15 individuals who received two doses during the phase 3 trial of the vaccine (collected 134–230 days after the second dose). Antibody neutralisation of P.1/28, P.1/30, and B isolates by plasma samples were compared in terms of median virus neutralisation titre (VNT 50, defined as the reciprocal value of the sample dilution that showed 50% protection against cytopathic effects).

          Findings

          In terms of VNT 50, plasma from individuals previously infected with SARS-CoV-2 had an 8·6 times lower neutralising capacity against the P.1 isolates (median VNT 50 30 [IQR <20–45] for P.1/28 and 30 [<20–40] for P.1/30) than against the lineage B isolate (260 [160–400]), with a binominal model showing significant reductions in lineage P.1 isolates compared with the lineage B isolate (p≤0·0001). Efficient neutralisation of P.1 isolates was not seen with plasma samples collected from individuals vaccinated with a first dose of CoronaVac 20–23 days earlier (VNT 50s below the limit of detection [<20] for most plasma samples), a second dose 17–38 days earlier (median VNT 50 24 [IQR <20–25] for P.1/28 and 28 [<20–25] for P.1/30), or a second dose 134–260 days earlier (all VNT 50s below limit of detection). Median VNT 50s against the lineage B isolate were 20 (IQR 20–30) after a first dose of CoronaVac 20–23 days earlier, 75 (<20–263) after a second dose 17–38 days earlier, and 20 (<20–30) after a second dose 134–260 days earlier. In plasma collected 17–38 days after a second dose of CoronaVac, neutralising capacity against both P.1 isolates was significantly decreased (p=0·0051 for P.1/28 and p=0·0336 for P.1/30) compared with that against the lineage B isolate. All data were corroborated by results obtained through plaque reduction neutralisation tests.

          Interpretation

          SARS-CoV-2 lineage P.1 might escape neutralisation by antibodies generated in response to polyclonal stimulation against previously circulating variants of SARS-CoV-2. Continuous genomic surveillance of SARS-CoV-2 combined with antibody neutralisation assays could help to guide national immunisation programmes.

          Funding

          São Paulo Research Foundation, Brazilian Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation and Funding Authority for Studies, Medical Research Council, National Council for Scientific and Technological Development, National Institutes of Health.

          Translation

          For the Portuguese translation of the abstract see Supplementary Materials section.

          Related collections

          Most cited references29

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          A new coronavirus associated with human respiratory disease in China

          Emerging infectious diseases, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Zika virus disease, present a major threat to public health 1–3 . Despite intense research efforts, how, when and where new diseases appear are still a source of considerable uncertainty. A severe respiratory disease was recently reported in Wuhan, Hubei province, China. As of 25 January 2020, at least 1,975 cases had been reported since the first patient was hospitalized on 12 December 2019. Epidemiological investigations have suggested that the outbreak was associated with a seafood market in Wuhan. Here we study a single patient who was a worker at the market and who was admitted to the Central Hospital of Wuhan on 26 December 2019 while experiencing a severe respiratory syndrome that included fever, dizziness and a cough. Metagenomic RNA sequencing 4 of a sample of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from the patient identified a new RNA virus strain from the family Coronaviridae, which is designated here ‘WH-Human 1’ coronavirus (and has also been referred to as ‘2019-nCoV’). Phylogenetic analysis of the complete viral genome (29,903 nucleotides) revealed that the virus was most closely related (89.1% nucleotide similarity) to a group of SARS-like coronaviruses (genus Betacoronavirus, subgenus Sarbecovirus) that had previously been found in bats in China 5 . This outbreak highlights the ongoing ability of viral spill-over from animals to cause severe disease in humans.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Virological assessment of hospitalized patients with COVID-2019

            Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an acute infection of the respiratory tract that emerged in late 20191,2. Initial outbreaks in China involved 13.8% of cases with severe courses, and 6.1% of cases with critical courses3. This severe presentation may result from the virus using a virus receptor that is expressed predominantly in the lung2,4; the same receptor tropism is thought to have determined the pathogenicity-but also aided in the control-of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 20035. However, there are reports of cases of COVID-19 in which the patient shows mild upper respiratory tract symptoms, which suggests the potential for pre- or oligosymptomatic transmission6-8. There is an urgent need for information on virus replication, immunity and infectivity in specific sites of the body. Here we report a detailed virological analysis of nine cases of COVID-19 that provides proof of active virus replication in tissues of the upper respiratory tract. Pharyngeal virus shedding was very high during the first week of symptoms, with a peak at 7.11 × 108 RNA copies per throat swab on day 4. Infectious virus was readily isolated from samples derived from the throat or lung, but not from stool samples-in spite of high concentrations of virus RNA. Blood and urine samples never yielded virus. Active replication in the throat was confirmed by the presence of viral replicative RNA intermediates in the throat samples. We consistently detected sequence-distinct virus populations in throat and lung samples from one patient, proving independent replication. The shedding of viral RNA from sputum outlasted the end of symptoms. Seroconversion occurred after 7 days in 50% of patients (and by day 14 in all patients), but was not followed by a rapid decline in viral load. COVID-19 can present as a mild illness of the upper respiratory tract. The confirmation of active virus replication in the upper respiratory tract has implications for the containment of COVID-19.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: found
              Is Open Access

              Detection of 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) by real-time RT-PCR

              Background The ongoing outbreak of the recently emerged novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) poses a challenge for public health laboratories as virus isolates are unavailable while there is growing evidence that the outbreak is more widespread than initially thought, and international spread through travellers does already occur. Aim We aimed to develop and deploy robust diagnostic methodology for use in public health laboratory settings without having virus material available. Methods Here we present a validated diagnostic workflow for 2019-nCoV, its design relying on close genetic relatedness of 2019-nCoV with SARS coronavirus, making use of synthetic nucleic acid technology. Results The workflow reliably detects 2019-nCoV, and further discriminates 2019-nCoV from SARS-CoV. Through coordination between academic and public laboratories, we confirmed assay exclusivity based on 297 original clinical specimens containing a full spectrum of human respiratory viruses. Control material is made available through European Virus Archive – Global (EVAg), a European Union infrastructure project. Conclusion The present study demonstrates the enormous response capacity achieved through coordination of academic and public laboratories in national and European research networks.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Lancet Microbe
                Lancet Microbe
                The Lancet. Microbe
                The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.
                2666-5247
                8 July 2021
                8 July 2021
                Affiliations
                [a ]Virology Research Centre, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil
                [b ]Laboratory of Emerging Viruses, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil
                [c ]Autoimmune Research Laboratory, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil
                [d ]Laboratory of Immunoinflammation, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil
                [e ]Animal Virology Laboratory, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil
                [f ]Brazilian Biosciences National Laboratory, Brazilian Centre for Research in Energy and Materials, Campinas, Brazil
                [g ]Hematology and Hemotherapy Center, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil
                [h ]Hematology and Transfusion Medicine Center, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil
                [i ]Experimental Medicine Research Cluster, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil
                [j ]Obesity and Comorbidities Research Center, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil
                [k ]Tropical Medicine Institute, Medical School, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
                [l ]Department of Infectious and Parasitic Disease, Medical School, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
                [m ]School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
                [n ]Brazilian Laboratory on Silencing Technologies, Department of Biochemistry and Tissue Biology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil
                [o ]Laboratory of Aging Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Tissue Biology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil
                [p ]Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, UK
                [q ]Laboratory of Virology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia, Brazil
                [r ]Fundação Hospitalar de Hematologia e Hemoterapia do Amazonas, Manaus, Brazil
                [s ]Department of Clinical Pathology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil
                [t ]Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil
                [u ]CDL Laboratório Santos e Vidal, Manaus, Brazil
                [v ]Campinas Department of Public Health Surveillance, Campinas, Brazil
                [w ]One Health Laboratory, Feevale University, Novo Hamburgo, Brazil
                [x ]DB Diagnósticos do Brasil, São Paulo, Brazil
                [y ]Departments of Medicine, Molecular Microbiology, Pathology, and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA
                [z ]Medical Research Council Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis, Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics, Imperial College London, London, UK
                [aa ]Biodiversity Research Centre, Federal University of Roraima, Boa Vista, Brazil
                Author notes
                [* ]Correspondence to: Dr Jose Luiz Proença-Módena, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Campinas, Campinas 13083-862, Brazil
                [*]

                Contributed equally

                [†]

                Senior authors; contributed equally

                Article
                S2666-5247(21)00129-4
                10.1016/S2666-5247(21)00129-4
                8266272
                34258603
                27372d15-07e0-4d56-946b-8220db272ee1
                © 2021 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an Open Access article under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 license

                Since January 2020 Elsevier has created a COVID-19 resource centre with free information in English and Mandarin on the novel coronavirus COVID-19. The COVID-19 resource centre is hosted on Elsevier Connect, the company's public news and information website. Elsevier hereby grants permission to make all its COVID-19-related research that is available on the COVID-19 resource centre - including this research content - immediately available in PubMed Central and other publicly funded repositories, such as the WHO COVID database with rights for unrestricted research re-use and analyses in any form or by any means with acknowledgement of the original source. These permissions are granted for free by Elsevier for as long as the COVID-19 resource centre remains active.

                Categories
                Articles

                Comments

                Comment on this article