0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Cryotherapy of cardiac arrhythmia: From basic science to the bedside

      ,

      Heart Rhythm

      Elsevier BV

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 40

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Kinetics of Water Loss from Cells at Subzero Temperatures and the Likelihood of Intracellular Freezing

           Peter Mazur (1963)
          The survival of various cells subjected to low temperature exposure is higher when they are cooled slowly. This increase is consistent with the view that slow cooling decreases the probability of intracellular freezing by permitting water to leave the cell rapidly enough to keep the protoplasm at its freezing point. The present study derives a quantitative relation between the amount of water in a cell and temperature. The relation is a differential equation involving cooling rate, surface-volume ratio, membrane permeability to water, and the temperature coefficient of the permeability constant. Numerical solutions to this equation give calculated water contents which permit predictions as to the likelihood of intracellular ice formation. Both the calculated water contents and the predictions on internal freezing are consistent with the experimental observations of several investigators.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Cryo-immunology: a review of the literature and proposed mechanisms for stimulatory versus suppressive immune responses.

             Michael Sabel (2009)
            The use of cryosurgery to ablate tumors is expanding, primarily due to its technical ease and minimal morbidity. A potential secondary advantage to the in situ freezing of malignant disease is the cryo-immunologic response, the generation of an anti-tumor immune response triggered by the natural absorption of the malignant tissue. While initially proposed based on clinical observations of distant disease regressing after cryoablation of a primary tumor, results from preclinical studies have been mixed and the existence of a cryo-immunologic response has been controversial. Recent studies have shed light on the potential mechanism by which cryoablation may modulate the immune system, also reveals that both immunostimulatory and immunosuppressive responses may be triggered. This article reviews the existing evidence regarding tumor cryo-immunology and puts forward hypotheses regarding patient, tumor and technical factors that may influence the resultant immune response and warrant further investigation.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Cryo-injury and biopreservation.

              Mammalian cells appear to be naturally tolerant to cold temperatures, but the formation of ice when cells are cooled leads to a variety of damaging effects. The study of cryo-injury, therefore, becomes the study of when and how ice is formed both inside and outside the cell during cooling. Protectant chemicals are used to control or prevent ice formation in many preservation protocols, but these chemical themselves tend to be damaging. Cooling and warming rates also strongly affect the amount and location of ice that is formed. Through careful modification of these parameters successful cold preservation techniques for many cell types have been developed, but there are many more cell types that have defied preservation techniques, and the extension of cell-based techniques to tissues and whole organs has been very limited. There are many aspects to the damaging effects of ice in cells that are still poorly understood. In this brief article we review our current understanding of cellular injury and highlight the aspects of cellular injury during cryopreservation that are still poorly understood.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Heart Rhythm
                Heart Rhythm
                Elsevier BV
                15475271
                October 2015
                October 2015
                : 12
                : 10
                : 2195-2203
                Article
                10.1016/j.hrthm.2015.05.034
                27532dbd-a6de-48cd-826f-2211398026e2
                © 2015

                Comments

                Comment on this article