Blog
About

6
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Intra-colonial diversity in the scleractinian coral, Acropora millepora: identifying the nutritional gradients underlying physiological integration and compartmentalised functioning

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Scleractinian corals are colonial organisms comprising multiple physiologically integrated polyps and branches. Colonialism in corals is highly beneficial, and allows a single colony to undergo several life processes at once through physiological integration and compartmentalised functioning. Elucidating differences in the biochemical composition of intra-colonial branch positions will provide valuable insight into the nutritional reserves underlying different regions in individual coral colonies. This will also ascertain prudent harvesting strategies of wild donor-colonies to generate coral stock with high survival and vigour prospects for reef-rehabilitation efforts and captive husbandry. This study examined the effects of colony branch position on the nutritional profile of two different colony sizes of the common scleractinian, Acropora millepora. For smaller colonies, branches were sampled at three locations: the colony centre (S-centre), 50% of the longitudinal radius length (LRL) (S-50), and the colony edge (S-edge). For larger colonies, four locations were sampled: the colony centre (L-centre), 33.3% of the LRL (L-33), 66.6% of the LRL (L-66), and the edge (L-edge). Results demonstrate significant branch position effects, with the edge regions containing higher protein, likely due to increased tissue synthesis and calcification. Meanwhile, storage lipid and total fatty acid concentrations were lower at the edges, possibly reflecting catabolism of high-energy nutrients to support proliferating cells. Results also showed a significant effect of colony size in the two classes examined. While the major protein and structural lipid sink was exhibited at the edge for both sizes, the major sink for high-energy lipids and fatty acids appeared to be the L-66 position of the larger colonies and the S-centre and S-50 positions for the smaller colonies. These results confirm that the scleractinian coral colony is not nutritionally homogeneous, and while different regions of the coral colony are functionally specialised, so too are their nutritional profiles geared toward meeting specific energetic demands.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 67

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Fiji: an open-source platform for biological-image analysis.

          Fiji is a distribution of the popular open-source software ImageJ focused on biological-image analysis. Fiji uses modern software engineering practices to combine powerful software libraries with a broad range of scripting languages to enable rapid prototyping of image-processing algorithms. Fiji facilitates the transformation of new algorithms into ImageJ plugins that can be shared with end users through an integrated update system. We propose Fiji as a platform for productive collaboration between computer science and biology research communities.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            ggplot2: Elegant graphics for data analysis

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              R: A Language and Environment for Statistical Computing

               R.C. Team,  RC Team,  R. TEAM (2016)
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                PeerJ
                PeerJ
                peerj
                peerj
                PeerJ
                PeerJ Inc. (San Francisco, USA )
                2167-8359
                29 January 2018
                2018
                : 6
                Affiliations
                [1 ]School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Deakin University , Warrnambool, Victoria, Australia
                [2 ]The National Sea Simulator, Australian Institute of Marine Science , Townsville, Queensland, Australia
                4239
                10.7717/peerj.4239
                5793706
                ©2018 Conlan et al.

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, reproduction and adaptation in any medium and for any purpose provided that it is properly attributed. For attribution, the original author(s), title, publication source (PeerJ) and either DOI or URL of the article must be cited.

                Funding
                The authors received no funding for this work.
                Categories
                Aquaculture, Fisheries and Fish Science
                Biochemistry
                Marine Biology

                colony, fatty acids, lipid, intra-colonial, coral

                Comments

                Comment on this article