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      Temperature and pH effect on glucose production from pretreated bagasse by a novel species of Citrobacter and other bacteria

      a , , b , b , a

      Heliyon

      Elsevier

      Microbiology, Biotechnology

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          Abstract

          Cellulolytic bacteria that produce cellulases, which are active over a range of pH and temperatures, can be used to catalyze hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic material. This is important in the production of second generation biofuels among other biotechnological applications. In this investigation, bacteria isolated from sugarcane bagasse were identified as strains of Enterobacter xiangfangensis, Serratia rubidaea, Klebsiella pneumoniae and a novel species of Citrobacter designated Citrobacter sp. UWIBGS10. The glucose production potential of these strains was studied on thermally and solvent pretreated sugarcane bagasse. This was performed at 24-hour intervals up to 168 hours in the range of pH 5–9 and temperature range 25–40 °C. Maximal concentrations of glucose for Citrobacter sp. UWIBGS10 occurred at pH 6 and 25 °C. For E. xiangfangensis, S. rubidaea, K. pneumoniae glucose concentrations were consistent across the pH and temperature ranges examined. From these results it could be concluded that the bacteria demonstrated ability for lignocellulolytic hydrolysis for the production of glucose and could be further explored for the characterization of commercial cellulolytic enzymes.

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          Most cited references 27

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          Identifying the dominant soil bacterial taxa in libraries of 16S rRNA and 16S rRNA genes.

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            Microbial cellulose utilization: fundamentals and biotechnology.

            Fundamental features of microbial cellulose utilization are examined at successively higher levels of aggregation encompassing the structure and composition of cellulosic biomass, taxonomic diversity, cellulase enzyme systems, molecular biology of cellulase enzymes, physiology of cellulolytic microorganisms, ecological aspects of cellulase-degrading communities, and rate-limiting factors in nature. The methodological basis for studying microbial cellulose utilization is considered relative to quantification of cells and enzymes in the presence of solid substrates as well as apparatus and analysis for cellulose-grown continuous cultures. Quantitative description of cellulose hydrolysis is addressed with respect to adsorption of cellulase enzymes, rates of enzymatic hydrolysis, bioenergetics of microbial cellulose utilization, kinetics of microbial cellulose utilization, and contrasting features compared to soluble substrate kinetics. A biological perspective on processing cellulosic biomass is presented, including features of pretreated substrates and alternative process configurations. Organism development is considered for "consolidated bioprocessing" (CBP), in which the production of cellulolytic enzymes, hydrolysis of biomass, and fermentation of resulting sugars to desired products occur in one step. Two organism development strategies for CBP are examined: (i) improve product yield and tolerance in microorganisms able to utilize cellulose, or (ii) express a heterologous system for cellulose hydrolysis and utilization in microorganisms that exhibit high product yield and tolerance. A concluding discussion identifies unresolved issues pertaining to microbial cellulose utilization, suggests approaches by which such issues might be resolved, and contrasts a microbially oriented cellulose hydrolysis paradigm to the more conventional enzymatically oriented paradigm in both fundamental and applied contexts.
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              Organosolv pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass for enzymatic hydrolysis.

              Production of ethanol by bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass has attracted much interest in recent years. However, the pretreatment process for increasing the enzymatic digestibility of cellulose has become a key step in commercialized production of cellulosic ethanol. During the last decades, many pretreatment processes have been developed for decreasing the biomass recalcitrance, but only a few of them seem to be promising. From the point of view for integrated utilization of lignocellulosic biomass, organosolv pretreatment provides a pathway for biorefining of biomass. This review presents the progress of organosolv pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass in recent decades, especially on alcohol, organic acid, organic peracid and acetone pretreatments, and corresponding action mechanisms. Evaluation and prospect of organosolv pretreatment were performed. Finally, some recommendations for future investigation of this pretreatment method were given.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Heliyon
                Heliyon
                Heliyon
                Elsevier
                2405-8440
                20 June 2018
                June 2018
                20 June 2018
                : 4
                : 6
                Affiliations
                [a ]Department of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus, St. Michael, Barbados
                [b ]Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Prince Edwards Island, 550 University Avenue, Charlottetown, PE C1A 4P3, Canada
                Author notes
                []Corresponding author. jamila.jones@ 123456mycavehill.uwi.edu
                Article
                S2405-8440(18)31126-5 e00657
                10.1016/j.heliyon.2018.e00657
                6010966
                © 2018 The Authors

                This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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                Article

                microbiology, biotechnology

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