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Innate immune responses to trauma

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Nature Immunology

Springer Nature

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      Circulating Mitochondrial DAMPs Cause Inflammatory Responses to Injury

      Injury causes a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) clinically much like sepsis 1. Microbial pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) activate innate immunocytes through pattern recognition receptors 2. Similarly, cellular injury can release endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) that activate innate immunity 3. Mitochondria are evolutionary endosymbionts that were derived from bacteria 4 and so might bear bacterial molecular motifs. We show here that injury releases mitochondrial DAMPs (MTD) into the circulation with functionally important immune consequences. MTD include formyl peptides and mitochondrial DNA. These activate human neutrophils (PMN) through formyl peptide receptor-1 and TLR9 respectively. MTD promote PMN Ca2+ flux and phosphorylation of MAP kinases, thus leading to PMN migration and degranulation in vitro and in vivo. Circulating MTD can elicit neutrophil-mediated organ injury. Cellular disruption by trauma releases mitochondrial DAMPs with evolutionarily conserved similarities to bacterial PAMPs into the circulation. These can then signal through identical innate immune pathways to create a sepsis-like state. The release of such mitochondrial ‘enemies within’ by cellular injury is a key link between trauma, inflammation and SIRS.
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        Bone marrow stromal cells attenuate sepsis via prostaglandin E(2)-dependent reprogramming of host macrophages to increase their interleukin-10 production.

        Sepsis causes over 200,000 deaths yearly in the US; better treatments are urgently needed. Administering bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs -- also known as mesenchymal stem cells) to mice before or shortly after inducing sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture reduced mortality and improved organ function. The beneficial effect of BMSCs was eliminated by macrophage depletion or pretreatment with antibodies specific for interleukin-10 (IL-10) or IL-10 receptor. Monocytes and/or macrophages from septic lungs made more IL-10 when prepared from mice treated with BMSCs versus untreated mice. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages produced more IL-10 when cultured with BMSCs, but this effect was eliminated if the BMSCs lacked the genes encoding Toll-like receptor 4, myeloid differentiation primary response gene-88, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-1a or cyclooxygenase-2. Our results suggest that BMSCs (activated by LPS or TNF-alpha) reprogram macrophages by releasing prostaglandin E(2) that acts on the macrophages through the prostaglandin EP2 and EP4 receptors. Because BMSCs have been successfully given to humans and can easily be cultured and might be used without human leukocyte antigen matching, we suggest that cultured, banked human BMSCs may be effective in treating sepsis in high-risk patient groups.
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          mTOR- and HIF-1α-mediated aerobic glycolysis as metabolic basis for trained immunity.

          Epigenetic reprogramming of myeloid cells, also known as trained immunity, confers nonspecific protection from secondary infections. Using histone modification profiles of human monocytes trained with the Candida albicans cell wall constituent β-glucan, together with a genome-wide transcriptome, we identified the induced expression of genes involved in glucose metabolism. Trained monocytes display high glucose consumption, high lactate production, and a high ratio of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) to its reduced form (NADH), reflecting a shift in metabolism with an increase in glycolysis dependent on the activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) through a dectin-1-Akt-HIF-1α (hypoxia-inducible factor-1α) pathway. Inhibition of Akt, mTOR, or HIF-1α blocked monocyte induction of trained immunity, whereas the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activator metformin inhibited the innate immune response to fungal infection. Mice with a myeloid cell-specific defect in HIF-1α were unable to mount trained immunity against bacterial sepsis. Our results indicate that induction of aerobic glycolysis through an Akt-mTOR-HIF-1α pathway represents the metabolic basis of trained immunity. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.
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            Author and article information

            Journal
            Nature Immunology
            Nat Immunol
            Springer Nature
            1529-2908
            1529-2916
            March 5 2018
            :
            :
            10.1038/s41590-018-0064-8
            © 2018

            http://www.springer.com/tdm

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