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      Self-healing polymeric materials: A review of recent developments

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      Progress in Polymer Science

      Elsevier BV

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          Cutaneous wound healing.

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            Reptation of a Polymer Chain in the Presence of Fixed Obstacles

             P de Gennes (1971)
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              Autonomic healing of polymer composites.

              Structural polymers are susceptible to damage in the form of cracks, which form deep within the structure where detection is difficult and repair is almost impossible. Cracking leads to mechanical degradation of fibre-reinforced polymer composites; in microelectronic polymeric components it can also lead to electrical failure. Microcracking induced by thermal and mechanical fatigue is also a long-standing problem in polymer adhesives. Regardless of the application, once cracks have formed within polymeric materials, the integrity of the structure is significantly compromised. Experiments exploring the concept of self-repair have been previously reported, but the only successful crack-healing methods that have been reported so far require some form of manual intervention. Here we report a structural polymeric material with the ability to autonomically heal cracks. The material incorporates a microencapsulated healing agent that is released upon crack intrusion. Polymerization of the healing agent is then triggered by contact with an embedded catalyst, bonding the crack faces. Our fracture experiments yield as much as 75% recovery in toughness, and we expect that our approach will be applicable to other brittle materials systems (including ceramics and glasses).
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Progress in Polymer Science
                Progress in Polymer Science
                Elsevier BV
                00796700
                May 2008
                May 2008
                : 33
                : 5
                : 479-522
                Article
                10.1016/j.progpolymsci.2008.02.001
                © 2008

                http://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

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