Blog
About

4
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      The Risks, Benefits, and Ethics of Trauma-Focused Research Participation

      ,

      Ethics & Behavior

      Informa UK Limited

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 32

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Ethical principles of psychologists and code of conduct.

          (2002)
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Written emotional expression: effect sizes, outcome types, and moderating variables.

             Joshua Smyth (1998)
            A research synthesis was conducted to examine the relationship between a written emotional expression task and subsequent health. This writing task was found to lead to significantly improved health outcomes in healthy participants. Health was enhanced in 4 outcome types--reported physical health, psychological well-being, physiological functioning, and general functioning--but health behaviors were not influenced. Writing also increased immediate (pre- to postwriting) distress, which was unrelated to health outcomes. The relation between written emotional expression and health was moderated by a number of variables, including the use of college students as participants, gender, duration of the manipulation, publication status of the study, and specific writing content instructions.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Participation in trauma research: is there evidence of harm?

              Few studies have examined the impact of trauma research participation upon trauma survivors. Empirical data regarding reactions to research participation would be very useful to address the question of whether it is harmful for trauma survivors to participate in trauma studies. We examined participant reactions to different trauma assessment procedures in domestic violence (N = 260), rape (N = 108), and physical assault (N = 62) samples. Results indicated that participation was very well tolerated by the vast majority of the trauma survivors. Participants generally found that the assessment experience was not distressing and was, in fact, viewed as an interesting and valuable experience. The findings suggest that trauma survivors are not too fragile to participate in trauma research even in the acute aftermath of a traumatic experience.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Ethics & Behavior
                Ethics & Behavior
                Informa UK Limited
                1050-8422
                1532-7019
                December 13 2010
                December 13 2010
                : 20
                : 6
                : 429-442
                Article
                10.1080/10508422.2010.521443
                © 2010

                Comments

                Comment on this article