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      The oral microbiota: dynamic communities and host interactions

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      Nature Reviews Microbiology

      Springer Nature America, Inc

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          Abstract

          <p class="first" id="P3">The dynamic and polymicrobial oral microbiome is a direct precursor of diseases such as dental caries and periodontitis, two of the most prevalent microbially induced disorders worldwide. Distinct microenvironments at oral barriers harbour unique microbial communities, which are regulated through sophisticated signalling systems and by host and environmental factors. The collective function of microbial communities is a major driver of homeostasis or dysbiosis and ultimately health or disease. Despite different aetiologies, periodontitis and caries are each driven by a feedforward loop between the microbiota and host factors (inflammation and dietary sugars, respectively) that favours the emergence and persistence of dysbiosis. In this Review, we discuss current knowledge and emerging mechanisms governing oral polymicrobial synergy and dysbiosis that have both enhanced our understanding of pathogenic mechanisms and aided the design of innovative therapeutic approaches for oral diseases. </p>

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          Most cited references 117

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          The Black Queen Hypothesis: Evolution of Dependencies through Adaptive Gene Loss

          ABSTRACT Reductive genomic evolution, driven by genetic drift, is common in endosymbiotic bacteria. Genome reduction is less common in free-living organisms, but it has occurred in the numerically dominant open-ocean bacterioplankton Prochlorococcus and “Candidatus Pelagibacter,” and in these cases the reduction appears to be driven by natural selection rather than drift. Gene loss in free-living organisms may leave them dependent on cooccurring microbes for lost metabolic functions. We present the Black Queen Hypothesis (BQH), a novel theory of reductive evolution that explains how selection leads to such dependencies; its name refers to the queen of spades in the game Hearts, where the usual strategy is to avoid taking this card. Gene loss can provide a selective advantage by conserving an organism’s limiting resources, provided the gene’s function is dispensable. Many vital genetic functions are leaky, thereby unavoidably producing public goods that are available to the entire community. Such leaky functions are thus dispensable for individuals, provided they are not lost entirely from the community. The BQH predicts that the loss of a costly, leaky function is selectively favored at the individual level and will proceed until the production of public goods is just sufficient to support the equilibrium community; at that point, the benefit of any further loss would be offset by the cost. Evolution in accordance with the BQH thus generates “beneficiaries” of reduced genomic content that are dependent on leaky “helpers,” and it may explain the observed nonuniversality of prototrophy, stress resistance, and other cellular functions in the microbial world.
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            The subgingival microbiome in health and periodontitis and its relationship with community biomass and inflammation.

            The goals of this study were to better understand the ecology of oral subgingival communities in health and periodontitis and elucidate the relationship between inflammation and the subgingival microbiome. Accordingly, we used 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene libraries and quantitative PCR to characterize the subgingival microbiome of 22 subjects with chronic periodontitis. Each subject was sampled at two sites with similar periodontal destruction but differing in the presence of bleeding, a clinical indicator of increased inflammation. Communities in periodontitis were also compared with those from 10 healthy individuals. In periodontitis, presence of bleeding was not associated with different α-diversity or with a distinct microbiome, however, bleeding sites showed higher total bacterial load. In contrast, communities in health and periodontitis largely differed, with higher diversity and biomass in periodontitis. Shifts in community structure from health to periodontitis resembled ecological succession, with emergence of newly dominant taxa in periodontitis without replacement of primary health-associated species. That is, periodontitis communities had higher proportions of Spirochetes, Synergistetes, Firmicutes and Chloroflexi, among other taxa, while the proportions of Actinobacteria, particularly Actinomyces, were higher in health. Total Actinomyces load, however, remained constant from health to periodontitis. Moreover, an association existed between biomass and community structure in periodontitis, with the proportion of specific taxa correlating with bacterial load. Our study provides a global-scale framework for the ecological events in subgingival communities that underline the development of periodontitis. The association, in periodontitis, between inflammation, community biomass and community structure and their role in disease progression warrant further investigation.
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              The role of bacteria in the caries process: ecological perspectives.

              Dental biofilms produce acids from carbohydrates that result in caries. According to the extended caries ecological hypothesis, the caries process consists of 3 reversible stages. The microflora on clinically sound enamel surfaces contains mainly non-mutans streptococci and Actinomyces, in which acidification is mild and infrequent. This is compatible with equilibrium of the demineralization/remineralization balance or shifts the mineral balance toward net mineral gain (dynamic stability stage). When sugar is supplied frequently, acidification becomes moderate and frequent. This may enhance the acidogenicity and acidurance of the non-mutans bacteria adaptively. In addition, more aciduric strains, such as 'low-pH' non-mutans streptococci, may increase selectively. These microbial acid-induced adaptation and selection processes may, over time, shift the demineralization/remineralization balance toward net mineral loss, leading to initiation/progression of dental caries (acidogenic stage). Under severe and prolonged acidic conditions, more aciduric bacteria become dominant through acid-induced selection by temporary acid-impairment and acid-inhibition of growth (aciduric stage). At this stage, mutans streptococci and lactobacilli as well as aciduric strains of non-mutans streptococci, Actinomyces, bifidobacteria, and yeasts may become dominant. Many acidogenic and aciduric bacteria are involved in caries. Environmental acidification is the main determinant of the phenotypic and genotypic changes that occur in the microflora during caries.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature Reviews Microbiology
                Nat Rev Microbiol
                Springer Nature America, Inc
                1740-1526
                1740-1534
                October 9 2018
                Article
                10.1038/s41579-018-0089-x
                6278837
                30301974
                28642091-9ea1-4a70-9bec-3da7b04d99ee
                © 2018

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