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      “I will never go to Hong Kong again!” How the secondary crisis communication of “Occupy Central” on Weibo shifted to a tourism boycott

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          Abstract

          Social media, an open space for the public's opinion and expression, has become an increasingly essential issue in crisis events, leading to secondary crisis communication. Realizing the potential risk of that, this study took the “Occupy Central” spreading on Weibo as a case, and applied topic clustering and sentiment analysis to examine the sequential characteristics of secondary crisis communication on social media in topics and emotions. Results show that the topics Weibo users discussed shifted from a political event to tourism boycott, with emotions turning increasingly negative. The turning point of such a transfer was aroused group conflicts and negative emotions elicited between people from mainland China and Hong Kong. The results indicate the necessity of emphasizing secondary crisis communication during a crisis due to the dynamic and sequential change of topics and public's emotions, which may result in new crises impacting the tourism destination where the initial crisis occurs.

          Highlights

          • Secondary crisis communication on social media is essential to crisis management.

          • The public's online participation promotes secondary crisis communication.

          • The topics Weibo users discussed about Occupy Central shifted to a tourism boycott.

          • The turning point was the group conflicts aroused and negative emotions elicited.

          • Therefore, secondary crisis communication may potentially threaten tourism destinations.

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          Most cited references 89

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Tour Manag
                Tour Manag
                Tourism Management
                Elsevier Ltd.
                0261-5177
                1879-3193
                3 May 2017
                October 2017
                3 May 2017
                : 62
                : 159-172
                Affiliations
                [a ]School of Tourism Management, Sun Yat-sen University, Building 329, 135 Xingangxi Road, Guangzhou 510275, PR China
                [b ]Center for Tourism Planning and Research, Sun Yat-sen University, Building 329, 135 Xingangxi Road, Guangzhou 510275, PR China
                Author notes
                []Corresponding author. School of Tourism Management, Sun Yat-sen University, Building 329, 135 Xingangxi Road, Guangzhou 510275, PR China. bettyluoqiuju@ 123456126.com
                Article
                S0261-5177(17)30092-4
                10.1016/j.tourman.2017.04.007
                7125760
                © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

                Since January 2020 Elsevier has created a COVID-19 resource centre with free information in English and Mandarin on the novel coronavirus COVID-19. The COVID-19 resource centre is hosted on Elsevier Connect, the company's public news and information website. Elsevier hereby grants permission to make all its COVID-19-related research that is available on the COVID-19 resource centre - including this research content - immediately available in PubMed Central and other publicly funded repositories, such as the WHO COVID database with rights for unrestricted research re-use and analyses in any form or by any means with acknowledgement of the original source. These permissions are granted for free by Elsevier for as long as the COVID-19 resource centre remains active.

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