2
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Perplexing Presentations: Compulsory Neuronormativity and Cognitive Marginalisation in Social Work Practice with Autistic Mothers of Autistic Children

      The British Journal of Social Work
      Oxford University Press (OUP)

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          In recent years, there has been growing interest in exploring the experiences of autistic adults through a lens that adopts emancipatory theorisations of autism. However, despite this changing terrain, autistic people remain a highly subjugated population. Research has begun to theorise a distinctive form of epistemic injustice they encounter in which they are denied access to epistemic resources by a society that valorises cognitively normative ways of being, knowing and existing. An under-explored aspect of this emerging literature relates to the experiences of autistic mothers who are, themselves, much more likely to have autistic children. Evidence suggests that they may be at a substantially increased risk of involuntary social work interventions. This study explores the nature of these experiences, drawing on interviews with autistic mothers as well as my own, lived experiences as an autistic mother. It finds that, through a neuro-normative lens of social work scrutiny, indicators of neuro-divergency in both mothers and children are considered perplexing and assigned malign meanings by those with hermeneutic privilege. This was particularly evident in social work responses to children’s difficulties in attending school, with these difficulties located in mothers rather than in exclusionary, hostile school environments.

          Related collections

          Most cited references36

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          Whose Expertise Is It? Evidence for Autistic Adults as Critical Autism Experts

          Autistic and non-autistic adults’ agreement with scientific knowledge about autism, how they define autism, and their endorsement of stigmatizing conceptions of autism has not previously been examined. Using an online survey, we assessed autism knowledge and stigma among 636 adults with varied relationships to autism, including autistic people and nuclear family members. Autistic participants exhibited more scientifically based knowledge than others. They were more likely to describe autism experientially or as a neutral difference, and more often opposed the medical model. Autistic participants and family members reported lower stigma. Greater endorsement of the importance of normalizing autistic people was associated with heightened stigma. Findings suggest that autistic adults should be considered autism experts and involved as partners in autism research.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Improving social skills in children with ASD using a long-term, in-home social robot

            Social robots can offer tremendous possibilities for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) interventions. To date, most studies with this population have used short, isolated encounters in controlled laboratory settings. Our study focused on a 1-month, home-based intervention for increasing social communication skills of 12 children with ASD between 6 and 12 years old using an autonomous social robot. The children engaged in a triadic interaction with a caregiver and the robot for 30 min every day to complete activities on emotional storytelling, perspective-taking, and sequencing. The robot encouraged engagement, adapted the difficulty of the activities to the child’s past performance, and modeled positive social skills. The system maintained engagement over the 1-month deployment, and children showed improvement on joint attention skills with adults when not in the presence of the robot. These results were also consistent with caregiver questionnaires. Caregivers reported less prompting over time and overall increased communication.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Teaching children with autism appropriate play in unsupervised environments using a self-management treatment package.

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                The British Journal of Social Work
                Oxford University Press (OUP)
                0045-3102
                1468-263X
                February 20 2023
                February 20 2023
                Article
                10.1093/bjsw/bcac229
                28a26230-07bf-41c1-abfb-7ada4cc27420
                © 2023

                https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article