Blog
About

3
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      Advanced Interatrial Block: A Classic Electrocardiogram

      a , b

      Cardiology

      S. Karger AG

      Advanced interatrial block, Biphasic P waves, Atrial flutter

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Interatrial block (IAB; P wave ≧110 ms) indicates conduction delay between the right and left atria. IAB can present as partial or advanced and is denoted on the electrocardiogram (ECG) by bifid or biphasic P waves, respectively, the latter in inferior leads. The importance of IAB cannot be overemphasized due to high prevalence, especially at ages 60 and over, and due to grave associations with atrial flutter and fibrillation as well as congestive heart failure. Thus, we present a classic ECG of the much less common form of IAB, namely advanced IAB, as it serves as an excellent yardstick and teaching tool to help clinicians understand this medical entity thoroughly and to easily recognize this often missed type of block.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 5

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Electromechanical dysfunction of the left atrium associated with interatrial block.

          Our purpose was to determine the effect of interatrial block (IAB, P-wave duration >/=120 ms) on left atrial (LA) dynamics. IAB is associated with LA enlargement (LAE). LA dysfunction is associated with decreased left ventricular filling, a propensity for LA appendage thrombus formation, and reduced atrial natriuretic peptide levels. We evaluated LA function in patients with and without IAB matched for LA size. Echocardiograms with LA enlargement were analyzed. Twenty-four patients had IAB, and 16 patients without IAB formed the control group. LA volumes, A-wave acceleration times (At), LA stroke volume (LASV), ejection fraction (LAEF), and kinetic energy (LAKE) were calculated. The control group and patients with IAB had comparable maximal LA volume and diameter (P >.05). Patients with IAB had significantly longer At (115 +/- 39 ms vs 83 +/- 24 ms, P <.01) and smaller LASV (7 +/- 5 mL vs 17 +/- 6 mL, P <.01), LAEF (9% +/- 6% vs 25% +/- 8%, P <.01), and LAKE (20 +/- 14 vs 65 +/- 44 Kdyne/cm/s, P <.01). LAKE varied inversely with P-wave duration (r = -0.51, P <.01). P-wave duration and minimal LA volume were independent determinants of LAEF. Patients with IAB have a sluggish, poorly contractile LA, and the extent of dysfunction is related to the degree of electrical delay from IAB. IAB should be considered a marker of an electromechanically dysfunctional LA and hence a risk factor for atrial fibrillation and congestive heart failure.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Association of interatrial block with development of atrial fibrillation.

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Prevalence of interatrial block in a general hospital population.

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                CRD
                Cardiology
                10.1159/issn.0008-6312
                Cardiology
                S. Karger AG
                0008-6312
                1421-9751
                2005
                August 2005
                19 August 2005
                : 104
                : 1
                : 33-34
                Affiliations
                aDivision of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Mass., and bDivision of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, University Campus, Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Mass., USA
                Article
                86052 Cardiology 2005;104:33–34
                10.1159/000086052
                15942182
                © 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Figures: 1, References: 7, Pages: 2
                Categories
                Brief Observation

                Comments

                Comment on this article