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      Testing the feasibility of a guided imagery tobacco cessation intervention delivered by a telephone quitline: Study protocol for a randomized controlled feasibility trial

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          Abstract

          Background

          Guided imagery (GI) is an evidence-based method that uses the imagination to practice and achieve a desired outcome. Little research has focused on how GI can be delivered to smokers using remote or virtual methods, such as a telephone-based intervention. Telephone-based services for tobacco cessation (quitlines) have emerged as standard of care for tobacco cessation. However, quitlines reach only a small fraction of smokers, and men and racial/ethnic minorities are less likely to use quitlines than majority women. GI has the potential to attract under-served minority groups as well as smokers who are looking for an alternative approach to cessation. The present study is designed to test the feasibility and potential impact of a GI tobacco cessation intervention delivered by telephone. This study compares the GI intervention with a standard behavioral (SB) intervention.

          Methods

          Participants (N = 100) are randomized to either the GI (intervention) or SB (control) condition. Each condition features a 6-week intervention in which participants work with coaches to quit tobacco. Primary outcomes are feasibility related (recruitment, retention, adherence), and secondary outcomes include cessation at 6 months post-intervention (7-day and 30-day abstinence).

          Discussion

          A GI intervention delivered via quitline would allow for scalability and dissemination, potentially reaching a more representative group of smokers. Results from this study will determine the feasibility of delivering the GI intervention, and describe the reach of the intervention to under-represented tobacco users. If successful, our study results will guide the design and conduct of a future efficacy trial.

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          Most cited references 26

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          Credibility of analogue therapy rationales

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            Social Cognitive Theory: An Agentic Perspective

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              Reviews of evidence regarding interventions to reduce tobacco use and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke.

              This report presents the results of systematic reviews of effectiveness, applicability, other effects, economic evaluations, and barriers to use of selected population-based interventions intended to reduce tobacco use and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke. The related systematic reviews are linked by a common conceptual approach. These reviews form the basis of recommendations by the Task Force on Community Preventive Services (TFCPS) regarding the use of these selected interventions. The TFCPS recommendations are presented on page 67 of this supplement.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Contemp Clin Trials Commun
                Contemp Clin Trials Commun
                Contemporary Clinical Trials Communications
                Elsevier
                2451-8654
                22 August 2019
                December 2019
                22 August 2019
                : 16
                Affiliations
                [a ]University of Arizona, College of Nursing, USA
                [b ]West Virginia University, Social and Behavioral Sciences, School of Public Health, USA
                [c ]University of Arizona, Department of Family and Community Medicine, USA
                [d ]University of Arizona, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, USA
                Author notes
                []Corresponding author. 1305 N. Martin Avenue, Tucson, AZ, 85721, USA. judithg@ 123456email.arizona.edu
                Article
                S2451-8654(19)30199-1 100437
                10.1016/j.conctc.2019.100437
                6727006
                © 2019 The Authors

                This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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