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      Psychometrics Anonymous: Does a Transparent Data Sharing Policy Affect Data Collection?

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          Abstract

          As researchers, we are advised to share our data to improve transparency and increase the reproducibility of experiments. Simultaneously, making data freely accessible can raise ethical questions regarding the participants’ privacy. We first outline the challenges regarding “open data” for researchers in light of the GDPR. Then, we turn to the impact of an open-access data sharing policy on the participants: could the participants’ knowledge about the future use of the data alter the data itself? Through two pre-registered studies (N = 193, collected on campus and N = 543, online participation), we investigate whether disclosing that anonymized data will be publicly shared vs. not shared influences a potential participants’ intention to take part in the study. Using both frequentist and Bayesian analysis, we conclude towards an absence of effect of a difference in data sharing policy on scores in the Big Five questionnaire and social desirability, careless response behavior, and results in the anchoring paradigm. In the second study, a lexicometric analysis of participants’ reactions to openly sharing data reveals a readiness to share data and support transparency under the condition of preserved anonymity. Hence, if anonymity can be ensured, there seems to be no methodological or ethical drawback in transparent and open data sharing policies for many psychological studies.

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          Detecting outliers: Do not use standard deviation around the mean, use absolute deviation around the median

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            Investigating Variation in Replicability

            Although replication is a central tenet of science, direct replications are rare in psychology. This research tested variation in the replicability of 13 classic and contemporary effects across 36 independent samples totaling 6,344 participants. In the aggregate, 10 effects replicated consistently. One effect – imagined contact reducing prejudice – showed weak support for replicability. And two effects – flag priming influencing conservatism and currency priming influencing system justification – did not replicate. We compared whether the conditions such as lab versus online or US versus international sample predicted effect magnitudes. By and large they did not. The results of this small sample of effects suggest that replicability is more dependent on the effect itself than on the sample and setting used to investigate the effect.
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              A new scale of social desirability independent of psychopathology.

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Psychol Belg
                Psychol Belg
                2054-670X
                Psychologica Belgica
                Ubiquity Press
                0033-2879
                2054-670X
                19 September 2019
                2019
                : 59
                : 1
                : 373-392
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), BE
                [2 ]Université Lumière Lyon 2, FR
                Author notes
                Corresponding author: Julia Charlotte Eberlen ( Julia.Eberlen@ 123456ulb.ac.be )
                Article
                10.5334/pb.503
                6753307
                2957ba29-d619-43f8-8aaa-d91dabaa50f0
                Copyright: © 2019 The Author(s)

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC-BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                History
                : 06 May 2019
                : 19 August 2019
                Funding
                This project was supported by the F.R.S.-FNRS through a grant “aspirant.e F.R.S.-FNRS” to Julia Eberlen. We want to thank Elisa Coen for her support in preparing the testing material and the students participating in the research seminar for their help with data collection.
                Categories
                Research Article

                privacy,anonymity,gdpr,psychology,methods,data accessibility,open science

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