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      New oral anticoagulants: their advantages and disadvantages compared with vitamin K antagonists in the prevention and treatment of patients with thromboembolic events

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          Abstract

          Despite the discovery and application of many parenteral (unfractionated and low-molecular-weight heparins) and oral anticoagulant vitamin K antagonist (VKA) drugs, the prevention and treatment of venous and arterial thrombotic phenomena remain major medical challenges. Furthermore, VKAs are the only oral anticoagulants used during the past 60 years. The main objective of this study is to present recent data on non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) and to analyze their advantages and disadvantages compared with those of VKAs based on a large number of recent studies. NOACs are novel direct-acting medications that are selective for one specific coagulation factor, either thrombin (IIa) or activated factor X (Xa). Several NOACs, such as dabigatran (a direct inhibitor of FIIa) and rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban (direct inhibitors of factor Xa), have been used for at least 5 years but possibly 10 years. Unlike traditional VKAs, which prevent the coagulation process by suppressing the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent factors, NOACs directly inhibit key proteases (factors IIa and Xa). The important indications of these drugs are the prevention and treatment of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolisms, and the prevention of atherothrombotic events in the heart and brain of patients with acute coronary syndrome and atrial fibrillation. They are not fixed, and dose-various strengths are available. Most studies have reported that more advantages than disadvantages for NOACs when compared with VKAs, with the most important advantages of NOACs including safety issues (ie, a lower incidence of major bleeding), convenience of use, minor drug and food interactions, a wide therapeutic window, and no need for laboratory monitoring. Nonetheless, there are some conditions for which VKAs remain the drug of choice. Based on the available data, we can conclude that NOACs have greater advantages and fewer disadvantages compared with VKAs. New studies are required to further assess the efficacy of NOACs.

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          Most cited references 58

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          Rivaroxaban in patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome.

          Acute coronary syndromes arise from coronary atherosclerosis with superimposed thrombosis. Since factor Xa plays a central role in thrombosis, the inhibition of factor Xa with low-dose rivaroxaban might improve cardiovascular outcomes in patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 15,526 patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome to receive twice-daily doses of either 2.5 mg or 5 mg of rivaroxaban or placebo for a mean of 13 months and up to 31 months. The primary efficacy end point was a composite of death from cardiovascular causes, myocardial infarction, or stroke. Rivaroxaban significantly reduced the primary efficacy end point, as compared with placebo, with respective rates of 8.9% and 10.7% (hazard ratio in the rivaroxaban group, 0.84; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.74 to 0.96; P=0.008), with significant improvement for both the twice-daily 2.5-mg dose (9.1% vs. 10.7%, P=0.02) and the twice-daily 5-mg dose (8.8% vs. 10.7%, P=0.03). The twice-daily 2.5-mg dose of rivaroxaban reduced the rates of death from cardiovascular causes (2.7% vs. 4.1%, P=0.002) and from any cause (2.9% vs. 4.5%, P=0.002), a survival benefit that was not seen with the twice-daily 5-mg dose. As compared with placebo, rivaroxaban increased the rates of major bleeding not related to coronary-artery bypass grafting (2.1% vs. 0.6%, P<0.001) and intracranial hemorrhage (0.6% vs. 0.2%, P=0.009), without a significant increase in fatal bleeding (0.3% vs. 0.2%, P=0.66) or other adverse events. The twice-daily 2.5-mg dose resulted in fewer fatal bleeding events than the twice-daily 5-mg dose (0.1% vs. 0.4%, P=0.04). In patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome, rivaroxaban reduced the risk of the composite end point of death from cardiovascular causes, myocardial infarction, or stroke. Rivaroxaban increased the risk of major bleeding and intracranial hemorrhage but not the risk of fatal bleeding. (Funded by Johnson & Johnson and Bayer Healthcare; ATLAS ACS 2-TIMI 51 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00809965.).
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            A specific antidote for reversal of anticoagulation by direct and indirect inhibitors of coagulation factor Xa.

            Inhibitors of coagulation factor Xa (fXa) have emerged as a new class of antithrombotics but lack effective antidotes for patients experiencing serious bleeding. We designed and expressed a modified form of fXa as an antidote for fXa inhibitors. This recombinant protein (r-Antidote, PRT064445) is catalytically inactive and lacks the membrane-binding γ-carboxyglutamic acid domain of native fXa but retains the ability of native fXa to bind direct fXa inhibitors as well as low molecular weight heparin-activated antithrombin III (ATIII). r-Antidote dose-dependently reversed the inhibition of fXa by direct fXa inhibitors and corrected the prolongation of ex vivo clotting times by such inhibitors. In rabbits treated with the direct fXa inhibitor rivaroxaban, r-Antidote restored hemostasis in a liver laceration model. The effect of r-Antidote was mediated by reducing plasma anti-fXa activity and the non-protein bound fraction of the fXa inhibitor in plasma. In rats, r-Antidote administration dose-dependently and completely corrected increases in blood loss resulting from ATIII-dependent anticoagulation by enoxaparin or fondaparinux. r-Antidote has the potential to be used as a universal antidote for a broad range of fXa inhibitors.
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              Safety, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacokinetics of BAY 59-7939--an oral, direct Factor Xa inhibitor--after multiple dosing in healthy male subjects.

              There is a clinical need for safe new oral anticoagulants. The safety, tolerability, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacokinetics of BAY 59-7939--a novel, oral, direct Factor Xa (FXa) inhibitor--were investigated in this single-center, placebo-controlled, single-blind, parallel-group, multiple-dose escalation study. Healthy male subjects (aged 20-45 years, body mass index 18.6-31.4 kg/m(2)) received oral BAY 59-7939 (n=8 per dose regimen) or placebo (n=4 per dose regimen) on days 0 and 3-7. Dosing regimens were 5 mg once, twice (bid), or three times daily, and 10 mg, 20 mg, or 30 mg bid. There were no clinically relevant changes in bleeding time or other safety variables across all doses and regimens. There was no dose-related increase in the frequency or severity of adverse events with BAY 59-7939. Maximum inhibition of FXa activity occurred after approximately 3 h, and inhibition was maintained for at least 12 h for all doses. Prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and HepTest were prolonged to a similar extent to inhibition of FXa activity for all doses. Dose-proportional pharmacokinetics (AUC(tau, norm) and C(max, norm)) were observed at steady state (day 7). Maximum plasma concentrations were achieved after 3-4 h. The terminal half-life of BAY 59-7939 was 5.7-9.2 h at steady state. There was no relevant accumulation at any dose. BAY 59-7939 was safe and well tolerated across the wide dose range studied, with predictable, dose-proportional pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and no relevant accumulation beyond steady state. These results support further investigation of BAY 59-7939 in phase II clinical trials.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Ther Clin Risk Manag
                Ther Clin Risk Manag
                Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
                Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
                Dove Medical Press
                1176-6336
                1178-203X
                2015
                24 June 2015
                : 11
                : 967-977
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Institute of Pathophysiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Prishtina, Prishtina, Kosovo
                [2 ]Department of Hemostasis and Thrombosis, National Blood Transfusion Center of Kosovo, Prishtina, Kosovo
                [3 ]Clinic of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Prishtina, Prishtina, Kosovo, Prishtina, Kosovo
                [4 ]Clinic of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Prishtina
                [5 ]The Hospital and University Clinical Service of Kosovo, Prishtina, Kosovo
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Agon Y Mekaj, Clinic of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Prishtina, Rrethi i spitalit p.n., Prishtina 10000, Kosovo, Tel +377 4437 3545, Fax +386 4937 3545, Email agon.mekaj@ 123456uni-pr.edu
                Article
                tcrm-11-967
                10.2147/TCRM.S84210
                4485791
                © 2015 Mekaj et al. This work is published by Dove Medical Press Limited, and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License

                The full terms of the License are available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

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