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      Assessment of Psychological Burden and Occupational Burnout in Nurses Working in Intensive Care Units in Poland, Slovakia and the Czech Republic

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      Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention

      Journal of Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention

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          Abstract

          The work of an intensive care nurse involves the direct care of patients with life-threatening conditions. In this situation, the prevention of burdens associated with this work becomes important, but it must be preceded by their diagnosis. This diagnosis is possible using standardized tools for the subjective assessment of a psychological burden and an occupational burnout. Therefore, the aim of our research was to determine whether nurses working in the same specialties in different countries are exposed to the same burdens. The study involved 312 nurses, divided into three groups depending on their country of origin and in which they worked. Two equal groups of nurses each contained 106 people from Slovakia and the Czech Republic, while the third group was comprised of 100 people from Poland. The age of the groups studied, taken together was (M = 35.53 ± 8.86 min. 22 years max. 60 years). Various results were observed as regards psychological burden and occupational burnout in the groups studied. The strongest differences related to overload, non-specific reaction to stress, feelings of personal achievement and depersonalization, which depended on age and length of service in each workplace. Assessment of the mental load can be used to improve the organization of Nurses’ work creating safe working conditions in studied countries, taking into consideration the mobility of the workforce in the European Union.

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          Burnout and psychiatric morbidity among physicians engaged in end-of-life care for cancer patients: a cross-sectional nationwide survey in Japan.

          To determine the prevalence of burnout and psychiatric morbidity among physicians engaged in end-of-life care for cancer patients in Japan and to explore associated factors related to end-of-life care. Questionnaires were mailed to 1436 Japanese clinical oncologists and palliative care physicians with a request to complete the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), and to report on individual factors, including confidence in patient care. High levels of burnout and psychiatric morbidity were identified using cut-off scores of the MBI and GHQ-12. A total of 697 physicians returned the questionnaires (response rate, 49.6%). Twenty-two percent of the respondents had a high level of emotional exhaustion, 11% had a high level of depersonalization, 62% had a low level of personal accomplishment, and 20% had psychiatric morbidity. Clinical oncologists showed a significantly higher psychiatric morbidity than palliative care physicians. Confidence in having sufficient time to communicate with patients was significantly associated with all the burnout subscales. A low level of personal accomplishment was relatively high among Japanese physicians compared with previous studies. Insufficient confidence in the psychological care of patients was associated with physician burnout rather than involvement in end-of-life care.
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            Author and article information

            Journal
            Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention
            cswhi
            Journal of Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention
            2222386X
            20769741
            July 30 2019
            June 28 2019
            July 30 2019
            June 28 2019
            : 10
            : 2
            : 53-61
            Article
            10.22359/cswhi_10_2_08
            © 2019

            This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

            Psychology, Social & Behavioral Sciences

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