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      The (in)significance of TB and COVID-19 co-infection

      letter
      1 , 1
      The European Respiratory Journal
      European Respiratory Society

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          Abstract

          We read with great interest the research letter by Tadolini et al. in which they have published the first cohort of 49 cases of TB and COVID-19 co-infection. However, few issues regarding the letter need to be addressed.

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          Clinical Characteristics of Coronavirus Disease 2019 in China

          Abstract Background Since December 2019, when coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) emerged in Wuhan city and rapidly spread throughout China, data have been needed on the clinical characteristics of the affected patients. Methods We extracted data regarding 1099 patients with laboratory-confirmed Covid-19 from 552 hospitals in 30 provinces, autonomous regions, and municipalities in mainland China through January 29, 2020. The primary composite end point was admission to an intensive care unit (ICU), the use of mechanical ventilation, or death. Results The median age of the patients was 47 years; 41.9% of the patients were female. The primary composite end point occurred in 67 patients (6.1%), including 5.0% who were admitted to the ICU, 2.3% who underwent invasive mechanical ventilation, and 1.4% who died. Only 1.9% of the patients had a history of direct contact with wildlife. Among nonresidents of Wuhan, 72.3% had contact with residents of Wuhan, including 31.3% who had visited the city. The most common symptoms were fever (43.8% on admission and 88.7% during hospitalization) and cough (67.8%). Diarrhea was uncommon (3.8%). The median incubation period was 4 days (interquartile range, 2 to 7). On admission, ground-glass opacity was the most common radiologic finding on chest computed tomography (CT) (56.4%). No radiographic or CT abnormality was found in 157 of 877 patients (17.9%) with nonsevere disease and in 5 of 173 patients (2.9%) with severe disease. Lymphocytopenia was present in 83.2% of the patients on admission. Conclusions During the first 2 months of the current outbreak, Covid-19 spread rapidly throughout China and caused varying degrees of illness. Patients often presented without fever, and many did not have abnormal radiologic findings. (Funded by the National Health Commission of China and others.)
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            Active tuberculosis, sequelae and COVID-19 co-infection: first cohort of 49 cases

            The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) disease (COVID-19) pandemic has attracted interest because of its global rapid spread, clinical severity, high mortality rate, and capacity to overwhelm healthcare systems [1, 2]. SARS-CoV-2 transmission occurs mainly through droplets, although surface contamination contributes and debate continues on aerosol transmission [3–5].
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              COVID-19, tuberculosis, and poverty: preventing a perfect storm

              The COVID-19 pandemic is likely to be the defining global health crisis of our generation. As the United Nations Development Programme highlighted in their recent call to action, the impact of this pandemic will extend beyond the immediate medical consequences to have far-reaching and long-lasting social and economic impacts, threatening to disproportionately affect poorer people in poorer countries [1]. Income losses are anticipated to exceed $220 billion in developing countries, where many people live day-to-day without access to social protection, and food security is precarious [1]. Strikingly, a recent United Nations study suggests that the social and economic consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic could increase the number of people living in poverty by as much as half a billion, with the majority of these newly poor people living in Africa, South-East Asia, and Central and South America [2].
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Eur Respir J
                Eur. Respir. J
                ERJ
                erj
                The European Respiratory Journal
                European Respiratory Society
                0903-1936
                1399-3003
                18 June 2020
                18 June 2020
                : 2002105
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Pulmonary Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India
                [2 ]Pulmonary Medicine, Govt Medical College & Hospital, Chandigarh, India
                Author notes
                Alkesh Kumar Khurana, Pulmonary Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India. E-mail: lungcancer@ 123456rediffmail.com
                Article
                ERJ-02105-2020
                10.1183/13993003.02105-2020
                7301834
                32554537
                29bff95e-dab9-4838-86af-814f9d8c94b2
                Copyright ©ERS 2020

                This article is open access and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Licence 4.0.

                History
                : 1 June 2020
                : 8 June 2020
                Categories
                Correspondence

                Respiratory medicine
                Respiratory medicine

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