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      Prevalence and correlates of benzodiazepine use and misuse among young adults who use prescription opioids non-medically

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      Drug and Alcohol Dependence
      Elsevier BV

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          Abstract

          <div class="section"> <a class="named-anchor" id="S1"> <!-- named anchor --> </a> <h5 class="section-title" id="d1179650e167">Background</h5> <p id="P2">Benzodiazepine use dramatically increases the risk of unintentional overdose among people who use opioids non-medically. However, little is known about the patterns of co-occurring benzodiazepine and opioid use among young adults in the United States. </p> </div><div class="section"> <a class="named-anchor" id="S2"> <!-- named anchor --> </a> <h5 class="section-title" id="d1179650e172">Methods</h5> <p id="P3">The Rhode Island Young Adult Prescription Drug Study (RAPiDS) was a cross-sectional study from January 2015—February 2016. RAPiDS recruited 200 young adults aged 18–29 who reported past 30-day non-medical prescription opioid (NMPO) use. Using Wilcoxon rank sum test and Fisher’s exact test, we examined correlates associated with regular prescribed and non-medical use (defined as at least monthly) of benzodiazepines among NMPO users in Rhode Island. </p> </div><div class="section"> <a class="named-anchor" id="S3"> <!-- named anchor --> </a> <h5 class="section-title" id="d1179650e177">Results</h5> <p id="P4">Among participants, 171 (85.5%) reported lifetime benzodiazepine use and 125 (62.5%) reported regular benzodiazepine use. Nearly all (n=121, 96.8%) reported non-medical use and 43 (34.4%) reported prescribed use. Compared to the 75 participants who did not regularly use benzodiazepines, participants who reported regular use were more likely to be white (66.3% vs. 58.0%, p=0.03), have ever been incarcerated (52.8% vs. 37.3%, p=0.04) and been diagnosed with a mood disorder (bipolar: 29.6% vs. 16.0%, p=.04; anxiety: 56.8 vs. 36.0%, p=0.01). Although the association was marginally significant, accidental overdose was higher among those who were prescribed the benzodiazepine they used most frequently compared to those who were not (41.9% vs. 24.4%, p=.06). </p> </div><div class="section"> <a class="named-anchor" id="S4"> <!-- named anchor --> </a> <h5 class="section-title" id="d1179650e182">Conclusion</h5> <p id="P5">Benzodiazepine use and misuse are highly prevalent among young adult NMPO users. Harm reduction and prevention programs for this population are urgently needed. </p> </div>

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Drug and Alcohol Dependence
          Drug and Alcohol Dependence
          Elsevier BV
          03768716
          February 2018
          February 2018
          : 183
          : 73-77
          Article
          10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.10.023
          5803376
          29241103
          29c3534d-24e0-401c-a266-b7a50e04083f
          © 2018

          https://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/


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