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      Behavioral and ecological aspects of gleaning by a desert insectivorous bat Antrozous pallidus (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae)

      Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology

      Springer Nature

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          Most cited references 32

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          Bat predation and the evolution of frog vocalizations in the neotropics.

          Bat predation has probably had an important influence on the evolution of frog vocalizations in the Neotropics. The rate at which fringe-lipped bats capture frogs is significantly higher when the frogs are calling. These bats respond to a wide variety of calls from edible frogs, and, when simultaneously presented with a choice, choose the recorded call of a palatable species over that of a poisonous species and the call of a small species over that of one too large to capture. Thus the selective advantages of loud, rapid mating calls in anurans are balanced by an increased risk of predation.
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            Echolocation and pursuit of prey by bats.

            Echolocating bats use different information-gathering strategies for hunting prey in open, uncluttered environments, in relatively open environments with some obstacles, and in densely cluttered environments. These situations differ in the extent to which individual targets such as flying insects can be detected as isolated objects or must be separated perceptually from backgrounds. Echolocating bats also differ in whether they use high-resolution, multidimensional images of targets or concentrate specifically on one particular target dimension, such as movement, to detect prey.
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              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
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              Acoustic imaging in bat sonar: Echolocation signals and the evolution of echolocation

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
                Behav Ecol Sociobiol
                Springer Nature
                0340-5443
                1432-0762
                June 1982
                June 1982
                : 10
                : 3
                : 217-223
                Article
                10.1007/BF00299688
                © 1982
                Product

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