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      Moving on: transitioning young people with chronic kidney disease to adult care

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          Most cited references 58

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          Emerging adulthood: A theory of development from the late teens through the twenties.

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            The teen brain: insights from neuroimaging.

             Jay Giedd (2008)
            Few parents of a teenager are surprised to hear that the brain of a 16-year-old is different from the brain of an 8-year-old. Yet to pin down these differences in a rigorous scientific way has been elusive. Magnetic resonance imaging, with the capacity to provide exquisitely accurate quantifications of brain anatomy and physiology without the use of ionizing radiation, has launched a new era of adolescent neuroscience. Longitudinal studies of subjects from ages 3-30 years demonstrate a general pattern of childhood peaks of gray matter followed by adolescent declines, functional and structural increases in connectivity and integrative processing, and a changing balance between limbic/subcortical and frontal lobe functions, extending well into young adulthood. Although overinterpretation and premature application of neuroimaging findings for diagnostic purposes remains a risk, converging data from multiple imaging modalities is beginning to elucidate the implications of these brain changes on cognition, emotion, and behavior.
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              Supporting the health care transition from adolescence to adulthood in the medical home.

               P Sagerman,  ,  W Carl Cooley (2011)
              Optimal health care is achieved when each person, at every age, receives medically and developmentally appropriate care. The goal of a planned health care transition is to maximize lifelong functioning and well-being for all youth, including those who have special health care needs and those who do not. This process includes ensuring that high-quality, developmentally appropriate health care services are available in an uninterrupted manner as the person moves from adolescence to adulthood. A well-timed transition from child- to adult-oriented health care is specific to each person and ideally occurs between the ages of 18 and 21 years. Coordination of patient, family, and provider responsibilities enables youth to optimize their ability to assume adult roles and activities. This clinical report represents expert opinion and consensus on the practice-based implementation of transition for all youth beginning in early adolescence. It provides a structure for training and continuing education to further understanding of the nature of adolescent transition and how best to support it. Primary care physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants, as well as medical subspecialists, are encouraged to adopt these materials and make this process specific to their settings and populations. Copyright © 2011 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Pediatric Nephrology
                Pediatr Nephrol
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                0931-041X
                1432-198X
                June 2018
                July 13 2017
                June 2018
                : 33
                : 6
                : 973-983
                Article
                10.1007/s00467-017-3728-y
                © 2018

                http://www.springer.com/tdm

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