7
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Paleobiology of the Mesoproterozoic-Neoproterozoic transition: the Sukhaya Tunguska Formation, Turukhansk Uplift, Siberia

      , ,

      Precambrian Research

      Elsevier BV

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Silicified carbonates of the latest Mesoproterozoic Sukhaya Tunguska Formation, northwestern Siberia, contain abundant and diverse permineralized microfossils. Peritidal environments are dominated by microbial mats built by filamentous cyanobacteria comparable to modern species of Lyngbya and Phormidium. In subtidal to lower intertidal settings, mat-dwelling microbenthos and possible coastal microplankton are abundant. In contrast, densely woven mat populations with few associated taxa characterize more restricted parts of tidal flats; the preservation of vertically oriented sheath bundles and primary fenestrae indicates that in these mats carbonate cementation was commonly penecontemporaneous with mat growth. Eoentophysalis mats are limited to restricted environments where microlaminated carbonate precipitates formed on or just beneath the sediment surface. Most microbenthic populations are cyanobacterial, although eukaryotic microfossils may occur among the simple spheroidal cells interpreted as coastal plankton. Protists are more securely represented by large (up to 320 micrometers in diameter) but poorly preserved acritarchs in basinal facies. The Sukhaya Tunguska assemblage contains 27 species in 18 genera. By virtue of their stratigraphic longevity and their close and predictable association with specific paleoenvironmental conditions, including substrates, Proterozoic cyanobacteria support a model of bacterial evolution in which populations adapt rapidly to novel environments and, thereafter, resist competitive replacement. The resulting evolutionary pattern is one of accumulation and stasis rather than the turnover and replacement characteristic of Phanerozoic plants and animals.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 35

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Neoproterozoic variations in the C-isotopic composition of seawater: stratigraphic and biogeochemical implications.

           A. Kaufman,  A. Knoll (1995)
          The recent proliferation of stratigraphic studies of delta 13C variation in carbonates and organic C in later Neoproterozoic and basal Cambrian successions (approximately 850-530 Ma) indicates a strong oscillating trend in the C-isotopic composition of surface seawater. Alone, this trend does not adequately characterize discrete intervals in Neoproterozoic time. However, integrated with the vectorial signals provided by fossils and Sr-isotopic variations, C isotope chemostratigraphy facilitates the interbasinal correlation of later Neoproterozoic successions. Results of these studies are evaluated in terms of four stratigraphic intervals: (1) the Precambrian/Cambrian boundary, (2) the post-Varanger terminal Proterozoic, (3) the late Cryogenian, and (4) the early Cryogenian. Where biostratigraphic or radiometric data constrain the age of Neoproterozoic sedimentary sequences, secular variations in C and Sr isotopes can provide a level of stratigraphic resolution exceeding that provided by fossils alone. Isotopic data place strong constraints on the chemical evolution of seawater, linking it to major tectonic and paleoclimatic events. They also provide a biogeochemical framework for the understanding of the initial radiation of macroscopic metazoans, which is associated stratigraphically, and perhaps causally, with a global increase in the burial of organic C and a concomitant rise of atmospheric O2.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            The early evolution of eukaryotes: a geological perspective.

             Greg A. Knoll (1992)
            Molecular phylogenies of eukaryotic organisms imply patterns of biological and environmental history that can be tested against the geological record. As predicted by sequence comparisons, Precambrian rocks show evidence of episodic increases in biological diversity and atmospheric oxygen concentrations. Nonetheless, complete integration of the two records remains elusive and may require that the earliest macroscopic organisms be recognized as extinct experiments in eukaryotic multicellularity.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Megascopic eukaryotic algae from the 2.1-billion-year-old negaunee iron-formation, Michigan.

               M. Han,  B Runnegar (1992)
              Hundreds of specimens of spirally coiled, megascopic, carbonaceous fossils resembling Grypania spiralis (Walcott), have been found in the 2.1-billion-year-old Negaunee Iron-Formation at the Empire Mine, near Marquette, Michigan. This occurrence of Grypania is 700 million to 1000 million years older than fossils from previously known sites in Montana, China, and India. As Grypania appears to have been a photosynthetic alga, this discovery places the origin of organelle-bearing eukaryotic cells prior to 2.1 billion years ago.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Precambrian Research
                Precambrian Research
                Elsevier BV
                03019268
                December 1997
                December 1997
                : 85
                : 3-4
                : 201-239
                Article
                10.1016/S0301-9268(97)00035-1
                11541434
                © 1997

                Comments

                Comment on this article