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      Casing microbiome dynamics during button mushroom cultivation: implications for dry and wet bubble diseases

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          Most cited references 38

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          Susceptibility of biofilms to Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus attack.

          Biofilms are communities of microorganisms attached to a surface, and the growth of these surface attached communities is thought to provide microorganisms with protection against a range of biotic and abiotic agents. The capability of the gram-negative predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus to control and reduce an existing Escherichia coli biofilm was evaluated in a static assay. A reduction in biofilm biomass was observed as early as 3 h after exposure to the predator, and an 87% reduction in crystal violet staining corresponding to a 4-log reduction in biofilm cell viability was seen after a 24-h exposure period. We observed that an initial titer of Bdellovibrio as low as 10(2) PFU/well or an exposure to the predator as short as 30 min is sufficient to reduce a preformed biofilm. The ability of B. bacteriovorus to reduce an existing biofilm was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The reduction in biofilm biomass obtained after the first 24 h of exposure to the predator remained unchanged even after longer exposure periods and reinoculation of the samples with fresh Bdellovibrio; however, no genetically stable resistant population of the host bacteria could be detected. Our data suggest that growth in a biofilm does not prevent predation by Bdellovibrio but allows a level of survival from attack greater than that observed for planktonic cells. In flow cell experiments B. bacteriovorus was able to decrease the biomass of both E. coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms as determined by phase-contrast and epifluorescence microscopy.
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            Biological control in the microbiome era: Challenges and opportunities

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              Bioprospecting bacterial and fungal volatiles for sustainable agriculture.

              Current agricultural practice depends on a wide use of pesticides, bactericides, and fungicides. Increased demand for organic products indicates consumer preference for reduced chemical use. Therefore, there is a need to develop novel sustainable strategies for crop protection and enhancement that do not rely on genetic modification and/or harmful chemicals. An increasing body of evidence indicates that bacterial and fungal microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs) might provide an alternative to the use of chemicals to protect plants from pathogens and provide a setting for better crop welfare. It is well known that MVOCs can modulate the physiology of plants and microorganisms and in this Opinion we propose that MVOCs can be exploited as an ecofriendly, cost-effective, and sustainable strategy for agricultural practices.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Microbiology
                Microbiology Society
                1350-0872
                1465-2080
                June 01 2019
                June 01 2019
                : 165
                : 6
                : 611-624
                Affiliations
                [1 ] 2​Centro Tecnológico de Investigación del Champiñón de La Rioja (CTICH), Autol, Spain
                [2 ] 1​Department of Plant Sciences, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1, UK
                [3 ] 3​Plataforma de Genómica y Bioinformática, Centro de Investigación Biomédica de La Rioja (CIBIR), Logroño, Spain
                Article
                10.1099/mic.0.000792
                © 2019

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