37
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Characterization of RNase R-digested cellular RNA source that consists of lariat and circular RNAs from pre-mRNA splicing

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Besides linear RNAs, pre-mRNA splicing generates three forms of RNAs: lariat introns, Y-structure introns from trans-splicing, and circular exons through exon skipping. To study the persistence of excised introns in total cellular RNA, we used three Escherichia coli 3′ to 5′ exoribonucleases. Ribonuclease R (RNase R) thoroughly degrades the abundant linear RNAs and the Y-structure RNA, while preserving the loop portion of a lariat RNA. Ribonuclease II (RNase II) and polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) also preserve the lariat loop, but are less efficient in degrading linear RNAs. RNase R digestion of the total RNA from human skeletal muscle generates an RNA pool consisting of lariat and circular RNAs. RT–PCR across the branch sites confirmed lariat RNAs and circular RNAs in the pool generated by constitutive and alternative splicing of the dystrophin pre-mRNA. Our results indicate that RNase R treatment can be used to construct an intronic cDNA library, in which majority of the intron lariats are represented. The highly specific activity of RNase R implies its ability to screen for rare intragenic trans-splicing in any target gene with a large background of cis-splicing. Further analysis of the intronic RNA pool from a specific tissue or cell will provide insights into the global profile of alternative splicing.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 40

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Analysis of the mouse transcriptome based on functional annotation of 60,770 full-length cDNAs.

          Only a small proportion of the mouse genome is transcribed into mature messenger RNA transcripts. There is an international collaborative effort to identify all full-length mRNA transcripts from the mouse, and to ensure that each is represented in a physical collection of clones. Here we report the manual annotation of 60,770 full-length mouse complementary DNA sequences. These are clustered into 33,409 'transcriptional units', contributing 90.1% of a newly established mouse transcriptome database. Of these transcriptional units, 4,258 are new protein-coding and 11,665 are new non-coding messages, indicating that non-coding RNA is a major component of the transcriptome. 41% of all transcriptional units showed evidence of alternative splicing. In protein-coding transcripts, 79% of splice variations altered the protein product. Whole-transcriptome analyses resulted in the identification of 2,431 sense-antisense pairs. The present work, completely supported by physical clones, provides the most comprehensive survey of a mammalian transcriptome so far, and is a valuable resource for functional genomics.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            A computer program for aligning a cDNA sequence with a genomic DNA sequence.

            We address the problem of efficiently aligning a transcribed and spliced DNA sequence with a genomic sequence containing that gene, allowing for introns in the genomic sequence and a relatively small number of sequencing errors. A freely available computer program, described herein, solves the problem for a 100-kb genomic sequence in a few seconds on a workstation.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Splicing with inverted order of exons occurs proximal to large introns.

              Following our studies which showed that the alpha and beta exons of the chicken c-ets-1 gene are not conserved in the human homologue, we succeeded in identifying a novel human c-ets-1 transcript in which the normal order of exons is scrambled. By PCR and RNase protection assays, we demonstrated that while the order of exons is different from that in genomic DNA, splicing of these exons in aberrant order occurs in pairs and at the same conserved consensus splice sites used in the normally spliced transcript. The scrambled transcript is non-polyadenylated and is expressed at much lower levels than the normal transcript. It is not the consequence of genomic rearrangement at the ets-1 locus nor is it due to the transcription of any ets-1 pseudogene. These results confirm previous observations of scrambled splicing.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nucleic Acids Res
                Nucleic Acids Research
                Nucleic Acids Research
                Oxford University Press
                0305-1048
                1362-4962
                2006
                2006
                8 May 2006
                : 34
                : 8
                : e63
                Affiliations
                Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine 1011 NW 15th Street, Miami, FL 33136, USA
                1Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory 1 Bungtown Road, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724, USA
                Author notes
                *To whom correspondence should be addressed. Tel: +1 305 243 4621; Fax: +1 305 243 3065; Email: mayeda@ 123456miami.edu

                Present address: Jinhua Wang, Hartwell Center for Bioinformatics and Biotechnology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN 38105, USA

                Article
                10.1093/nar/gkl151
                1458517
                16682442
                © The Author 2006. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved

                The online version of this article has been published under an open access model. Users are entitled to use, reproduce, disseminate, or display the open access version of this article for non-commercial purposes provided that: the original authorship is properly and fully attributed; the Journal and Oxford University Press are attributed as the original place of publication with the correct citation details given; if an article is subsequently reproduced or disseminated not in its entirety but only in part or as a derivative work this must be clearly indicated. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oxfordjournals.org

                Categories
                Methods Online

                Genetics

                Comments

                Comment on this article