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      Reproductive Coercion and Prenatal Distress among Young Pregnant Women in Monrovia, Liberia

      research-article
      , MA a , b , , PhD c
      Health care for women international
      Reproductive coercion, Prenatal distress, Women, Liberia

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          Abstract

          Women who experience reproductive coercion may be at risk for poor reproductive health, but few studies have examined the potential mental health consequences. Using cross-sectional data of 195 pregnant women aged 18–30 in Monrovia, Liberia, we examined the association between reproductive coercion and prenatal distress. The prevalence of reproductive coercion with the current pregnancy was 9% (n=12). Young pregnant women who experienced reproductive coercion had more prenatal distress than women without these experiences (B (SE) =4.337 (2.091), p < .05). Reproductive coercion can affect the mental health of young pregnant women in Liberia. Family planning programs and providers should assess reproductive coercion with the current pregnancy among young pregnant women and find ways to help women mitigate distressing symptoms.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          8411543
          4493
          Health Care Women Int
          Health Care Women Int
          Health care for women international
          0739-9332
          1096-4665
          2 October 2018
          27 August 2018
          September 2018
          27 February 2020
          : 39
          : 9
          : 968-974
          Affiliations
          [a ]School of Public Health, Yale University, 60 College Street, P.O. Box 208034, New Haven, CT 06520
          [b ]Yale Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS, 135 College Street, Suite 200, New Haven, CT 06510-2483
          [c ]Department of Health Promotion and Behavior, University of Georgia, 100 Foster Rd, Athens, GA 30606
          Author notes
          Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Tiara C. Willie, Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, 60 College Street, New Haven, CT 06520, tiara.willie@ 123456yale.edu.
          Article
          PMC6393215 PMC6393215 6393215 nihpa990823
          10.1080/07399332.2018.1490740
          6393215
          30148421
          2ae871bf-78ec-44be-b511-3f9c79003ecd
          Categories
          Article

          Liberia,Women,Prenatal distress,Reproductive coercion
          Liberia, Women, Prenatal distress, Reproductive coercion

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