Blog
About

0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      A composite fibre optic catheter for monitoring peristaltic transit of an intra-luminal bead

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          A fibre optic motion sensor has been developed for monitoring the proximity and direction of motion of a ferrous bead travelling axial to the sensor. By integrating an array of these sensors into our previously developed fibre optic manometry catheters we demonstrate simultaneous detection of peristaltic muscular activity and the associated motion of ferrous beads through a colonic lumen. This allows the motion of solid content to be temporally and spatially related to pressure variations generated by peristaltic contractions without resorting to videoflouroscopy to track the motion of a radio opaque bolus. The composite catheter has been tested in an in-vitro animal preparation consisting of excised sections of rabbit colon. Cut-away image of the fibre optic motion sensor showing the location of the fibre Bragg gratings and the rare earth magnet.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 14

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          A ne method for studying gut transit times using radioopaque markers.

          A simple technique for measuring gastrointestinal transit times using radioopaque pellets of barium-impregnated polythene has been developed and validated. A normal range has been established by studying 25 normal subjects; all passed the first marker within three days and most passed 80% of the markers within five days.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Epidemiology and health care seeking in the functional GI disorders: a population-based study.

            Functional GI disorders (FGIDs) are common in clinical practice, but little is known about the epidemiology of these disorders in the general population. We aimed to determine the prevalence, association with psychological morbidity, and health care seeking behavior of FGIDs in the population. A random sample of subjects (n = 4500) aged > or = 18 yr and representative of the Australian population were mailed a validated questionnaire. For these subjects we measured all Rome I GI symptoms and physician visits over the past 12 months, as well as neuroticism, anxiety, depression, and somatic distress. The response rate for the study was 72%. The prevalence of any FGID was 34.6%, and 62.1% of these subjects had consulted a physician. There was considerable overlap of the FGIDs (19.2% had more than two disorders). Independent predictors for an FGID diagnosis were neuroticism, somatic distress, anxiety, bowel habit disturbance, abdominal pain frequency, and increasing age. However, psychological morbidity did not independently discriminate between consulters and nonconsulters with an FGID. More than one third of the general population have one or more FGIDs. There seems to be a modest link between psychological morbidity and FGIDs, although other unknown factors seem to be more important in explaining health care seeking for these disorders.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Comparison of gastric emptying of a nondigestible capsule to a radio-labelled meal in healthy and gastroparetic subjects.

              Gastric emptying scintigraphy (GES) using a radio-labelled meal is used to measure gastric emptying. A nondigestible capsule, SmartPill, records luminal pH, temperature, and pressure during gastrointestinal transit providing a measure of gastric emptying time (GET). To compare gastric emptying time and GES by assessing their correlation, and to compare GET and GES for discriminating healthy subjects from gastroparetics. Eighty-seven healthy subjects and 61 gastroparetics enrolled with simultaneous SmartPill and GES. Fasted subjects were ingested capsule and [(99m)Tc]-SC radio-labelled meal. Images were obtained every 30 min for 6 h. Gastric emptying time and percentage of meal remaining at 2/4 h were determined for each subject. The sensitivity/specificity and receiver operating characteristic analysis of each measure were determined for each subject. Correlation between GET and GES-4 h was 0.73 and GES-2 h was 0.63. The diagnostic accuracy from the receiver operating characteristic curve between gastroparetics and healthy subjects was GET = 0.83, GES-4 h = 0.82 and GES-2 h = 0.79. The 300-min cut-off time for GET gives sensitivity of 0.65 and specificity of 0.87 for diagnosis of gastroparesis. The corresponding sensitivity/specificity for 2 and 4 h standard GES measures were 0.34/0.93 and 0.44/0.93, respectively. SmartPill GET correlates with GES and discriminates between healthy and gastroparetic subjects offering a nonradioactive, standardized, ambulatory alternative to scintigraphy.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Biophotonics
                J. Biophoton
                Wiley
                1864063X
                March 2016
                March 2016
                November 30 2015
                : 9
                : 3
                : 305-310
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Medical Device Research Institute; School of Computer Science, Engineering and Mathematics, Flinders University; SA 5001 Australia
                [2 ]Griffith School of Engineering; Gold Coast Campus, Griffith University; QLD 4222 Australia
                [3 ]Human Physiology and Centre for Neuroscience; Flinders University; SA 5001 Australia
                [4 ]Departments of Gastroenterology & Surgery; Flinders Medical Centre; SA 5001 Australia
                Article
                10.1002/jbio.201500187
                26616543
                © 2015

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1

                http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/termsAndConditions

                Comments

                Comment on this article