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      Metabonomic investigations in mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni: An approach for biomarker identification

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          Abstract

          Schistosomiasis, a chronic and debilitating parasitic disease, affects approximately 200 million people in the developing world and imposes a substantial public health and economic impact. Accurately diagnosing at the individual level, monitoring disease progression, and assessing the impact of pharmacological interventions at the population level are of prime importance for controlling schistosomiasis. Using a Schistosoma mansoni-mouse model, we present a characterization of a parasitic infection by metabolic profiling, employing (1)H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate pattern recognition techniques. We infected 10 mice with 80 S. mansoni cercariae each and collected urine samples 49 and 56 days postinfection. Urine samples were also obtained from 10 uninfected control mice at the same time. The metabolic signature of an S. mansoni infection consists of reduced levels of the tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, including citrate, succinate, and 2-oxoglutarate, and increased levels of pyruvate, suggesting stimulated glycolysis. A disturbance of amino acid metabolism was also associated with an S. mansoni infection, as indicated by depletion of taurine, 2-oxoisocaproate, and 2-oxoisovalerate and elevation of tryptophan in the urine. A range of microbial-related metabolites, i.e., trimethylamine, phenylacetylglycine, acetate, p-cresol glucuronide, butyrate, propionate, and hippurate, were also coupled with an S. mansoni infection, indicating disturbances in the gut microbiota. Our work highlights the potential of metabolic profiling to enhance our understanding of biological responses to parasitic infections. It also holds promise as a basis for novel diagnostic tests with high sensitivity and specificity and for improved disease surveillance and control.

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          Most cited references36

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          Opinion: understanding 'global' systems biology: metabonomics and the continuum of metabolism.

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            750 MHz 1H and 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy of human blood plasma.

            High-resolution 750 MHz 1H NMR spectra of control human blood plasma have been measured and assigned by the concerted use of a range of spin-echo, two-dimensional J-resolved, and homonuclear and heteronuclear (1H-13C) correlation methods. The increased spectral dispersion and sensitivity at 750 MHz enable the assignment of numerous 1H and 13C resonances from many molecular species that cannot be detected at lower frequencies. This work presents the most comprehensive assignment of the 1H NMR spectra of blood plasma yet achieved and includes the assignment of signals from 43 low M(r) metabolites, including many with complex or strongly coupled spin systems. New assignments are also provided from the 1H and 13C NMR signals from several important macromolecular species in whole blood plasma, i.e., very-low-density, low-density, and high-density lipoproteins, albumin, and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein. The temperature dependence of the one-dimensional and spin-echo 750 MHz 1H NMR spectra of plasma was investigated over the range 292-310 K. The 1H NMR signals from the fatty acyl side chains of the lipoproteins increased substantially with temperature (hence also molecular mobility), with a disproportionate increase from lipids in low-density lipoprotein. Two-dimensional 1H-13C heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence spectroscopy at 292 and 310 K allowed both the direct detection of cholesterol and choline species bound in high-density lipoprotein and the assignment of their signals and confirmed the assignment of most of the lipoprotein resonances.
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              Pattern recognition by means of disjoint principal components models

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
                Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
                Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
                0027-8424
                1091-6490
                August 24 2004
                August 24 2004
                August 16 2004
                August 24 2004
                : 101
                : 34
                : 12676-12681
                Article
                10.1073/pnas.0404878101
                515115
                15314235
                2bbeaec7-ab27-4254-8763-0da936b9d137
                © 2004
                History

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