Blog
About

6
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      The relation of parenting, child temperament, and attachment security in early childhood to social competence at school entry.

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          A wealth of research demonstrates the importance of early parent-child interactions on children's social functioning. However, less is known about the interrelations between child and parent characteristics and parent-child interactions in early childhood. Moreover, few studies have broadly examined the longitudinal relations between these constructs and social competence. This study is an examination of the relations between parent responsiveness, negativity, and emotional supportiveness, attachment security, and child temperament, and their impact on children's social competence from infancy to kindergarten entry. The sample was derived from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study--Birth Cohort and included 6850 parent-child dyads. Observational and rating scale data were used. The proposed model was nearly fully supported by path analysis, and it provides insight into the complex relations between early parenting behaviors, child characteristics, and parent-child interactions in the development of social competence.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          J Sch Psychol
          Journal of school psychology
          Elsevier BV
          1873-3506
          0022-4405
          Oct 2013
          : 51
          : 5
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Nebraska Center for Research on Children, Youth, Families, and Schools, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 162J Whittier Research Center, Lincoln, NE 68583, USA. Electronic address: krispoli2@unl.edu.
          Article
          S0022-4405(13)00048-4
          10.1016/j.jsp.2013.05.007
          24060065

          Young children, Temperament, Social competence, Parenting

          Comments

          Comment on this article