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      Printing three-dimensional tissue analogues with decellularized extracellular matrix bioink

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          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The ability to print and pattern all the components that make up a tissue (cells and matrix materials) in three dimensions to generate structures similar to tissues is an exciting prospect of bioprinting. However, the majority of the matrix materials used so far for bioprinting cannot represent the complexity of natural extracellular matrix (ECM) and thus are unable to reconstitute the intrinsic cellular morphologies and functions. Here, we develop a method for the bioprinting of cell-laden constructs with novel decellularized extracellular matrix (dECM) bioink capable of providing an optimized microenvironment conducive to the growth of three-dimensional structured tissue. We show the versatility and flexibility of the developed bioprinting process using tissue-specific dECM bioinks, including adipose, cartilage and heart tissues, capable of providing crucial cues for cells engraftment, survival and long-term function. We achieve high cell viability and functionality of the printed dECM structures using our bioprinting method.

          Abstract

          The application of 3D printing to biomaterials presents interesting possibilities for tissue engineering. Here, the authors show that a printing medium derived from an extracellular matrix can be applied to printing tissue analogues with enhanced cell compatibility.

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          Most cited references 33

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          An overview of tissue and whole organ decellularization processes.

          Biologic scaffold materials composed of extracellular matrix (ECM) are typically derived by processes that involve decellularization of tissues or organs. Preservation of the complex composition and three-dimensional ultrastructure of the ECM is highly desirable but it is recognized that all methods of decellularization result in disruption of the architecture and potential loss of surface structure and composition. Physical methods and chemical and biologic agents are used in combination to lyse cells, followed by rinsing to remove cell remnants. Effective decellularization methodology is dictated by factors such as tissue density and organization, geometric and biologic properties desired for the end product, and the targeted clinical application. Tissue decellularization with preservation of ECM integrity and bioactivity can be optimized by making educated decisions regarding the agents and techniques utilized during processing. An overview of decellularization methods, their effect upon resulting ECM structure and composition, and recently described perfusion techniques for whole organ decellularization techniques are presented herein. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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            Tissue engineering--current challenges and expanding opportunities.

            Tissue engineering can be used to restore, maintain, or enhance tissues and organs. The potential impact of this field, however, is far broader-in the future, engineered tissues could reduce the need for organ replacement, and could greatly accelerate the development of new drugs that may cure patients, eliminating the need for organ transplants altogether.
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              Printing and prototyping of tissues and scaffolds.

               Brian Derby (2012)
              New manufacturing technologies under the banner of rapid prototyping enable the fabrication of structures close in architecture to biological tissue. In their simplest form, these technologies allow the manufacture of scaffolds upon which cells can grow for later implantation into the body. A more exciting prospect is the printing and patterning in three dimensions of all the components that make up a tissue (cells and matrix materials) to generate structures analogous to tissues; this has been termed bioprinting. Such techniques have opened new areas of research in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nat Commun
                Nat Commun
                Nature Communications
                Nature Pub. Group
                2041-1723
                02 June 2014
                : 5
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH) , 77 Cheongam ro, Nam-gu, Pohang, Kyungbuk 790-784, South Korea
                [2 ]Division of Integrative Biosciences and Biotechnology, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH) , 77 Cheongam ro, Nam-gu, Pohang, Kyungbuk 790-784, South Korea
                [3 ]Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington , Seattle, Waltham 98195, USA
                [4 ]Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea , 222 Banpo-daero, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-710, South Korea
                [5 ]Department of Biomedical Science, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea , 222 Banpo-daero, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-701, South Korea
                [6 ]Department of Plastic Surgery, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea , 222 Banpo-daero, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-701, South Korea
                [7 ]Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Polytechnic University , 2121 Jeongwang-dong, Siheungsi, Gyeonggi-do 429-793, South Korea
                [8 ]Center for Cardiovascular Biology, University of Washington , Seattle, Waltham 98109, USA
                [9 ]Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, University of Washington , Seattle, WA 98109, USA
                [10 ]These authors contributed equally to this work
                Author notes
                Article
                ncomms4935
                10.1038/ncomms4935
                4059935
                24887553
                Copyright © 2014, Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited. All Rights Reserved.

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

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