0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      Serum Estradiol Concentration as Measured by HPLC-RIA and Bone Mineral Density in Postmenopausal Women during Hormone Replacement Therapy

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Objective: To determine the relationship between the serum estradiol concentration and bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine in postmenopausal women treated with conjugated equine estrogen (CEE) and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) every other day and every day. Methods: Eighty-four postmenopausal women were randomly treated with hormone replacement therapy (HRT) every other day and every day. Forty-seven women received oral administration of 0.625 mg CEE and 2.5 mg MPA every other day, and 37 women received oral administration of 0.625 mg CEE and 2.5 mg MPA every day. BMD of the lumbar spine at 12 months and serum concentrations of estradiol and estrone at 6 and 12 months after treatment were examined. Results: The estradiol concentration in subjects treated every other day showed a significant (p < 0.001) positive correlation with the percentage change in lumbar BMD, while that in subjects treated every day was not correlated with the percentage change in BMD. The differences between serum estradiol concentrations after 12 months of treatment and initial serum estradiol values in women treated every other day and every day also showed a significant (p < 0.01 and 0.05, respectively) positive correlation with percentage changes in BMD. In women treated every other day, body mass index (BMI) in the subjects in whom BMD did not increase was significantly (p < 0.01) lower than that in the subjects in whom BMD did increase. Conclusions: The serum estradiol concentration in women treated every other day has a strong positive correlation with the percentage change in lumbar BMD, but a higher estradiol concentration may be needed for women in whom BMD did not increase with HRT every other day after due consideration of individual characteristics such as BMI.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 11

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Endogenous hormones and the risk of hip and vertebral fractures among older women. Study of Osteoporotic Fractures Research Group.

          In postmenopausal women, the serum concentrations of endogenous sex hormones and vitamin D might influence the risk of hip and vertebral fractures. In a study of a cohort of women 65 years of age or older, we compared the serum hormone concentrations at base line in 133 women who subsequently had hip fractures and 138 women who subsequently had vertebral fractures with those in randomly selected control women from the same cohort. Women who were taking estrogen were excluded. The results were adjusted for age and weight. The women with undetectable serum estradiol concentrations (<5 pg per milliliter [18 pmol per liter]) had a relative risk of 2.5 for subsequent hip fracture (95 percent confidence interval, 1.4 to 4.6) and subsequent vertebral fracture (95 percent confidence interval, 1.4 to 4.2), as compared with the women with detectable serum estradiol concentrations. Serum concentrations of sex hormone-binding globulin that were 1.0 microg per deciliter (34.7 nmol per liter) or higher were associated with a relative risk of 2.0 for hip fracture (95 percent confidence interval, 1.1 to 3.9) and 2.3 for vertebral fracture (95 percent confidence interval, 1.2 to 4.4). Women with both undetectable serum estradiol concentrations and serum sex hormone-binding globulin concentrations of 1 microg per deciliter or more had a relative risk of 6.9 for hip fracture (95 percent confidence interval, 1.5 to 32.0) and 7.9 for vertebral fracture (95 percent confidence interval, 2.2 to 28.0). For those with low serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D concentrations (< or =23 pg per milliliter [55 pmol per liter]), the risk of hip fracture increased by a factor of 2.1 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.2 to 3.5). Postmenopausal women with undetectable serum estradiol concentrations and high serum concentrations of sex hormone-binding globulin have an increased risk of hip and vertebral fracture.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Effects of hormone therapy on bone mineral density: results from the postmenopausal estrogen/progestin interventions (PEPI) trial. The Writing Group for the PEPI.

            (1996)
            To assess the effects of hormone therapy on bone mineral density (BMD) in the spine and hip of postmenopausal women. A 3-year, multicenter, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial. A total of 875 healthy women aged 45 to 64 years recruited at 7 clinical centers. Treatments were (1) placebo; (2) conjugated equine estrogens (CEE), 0.625 mg/d; (3) CEE, 0.625 mg/d plus medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), 10 mg/d for 12 d/mo; (4) CEE, 0.625 mg/d plus MPA, 2.5 mg/d daily; or (5) CEE, 0.625 mg/d plus micronized progesterone (MP), 200 mg/d for 12 d/mo. Bone mineral density at baseline, 12 months, and 36 months. Participants assigned to the placebo group lost an average of 1.8% of spine BMD and 1.7% of hip BMD by the 36-month visit, while those assigned to active regimens gained BMD at both sites, ranging from 3.5% to 5.0% mean total increases in spinal BMD and a mean total increase of 1.7% of BMD in the hip. Changes in BMD for women assigned to active regimens were significantly greater than those assigned to placebo. Women assigned to CEE plus continuous MPA had significantly greater increases in spinal BMD (increase of 5%) than those assigned to the other 3 active regimens (average increase, 3.8%). Findings were similar among those adhering to assigned therapy, although, among adherent participants, there were no significant differences in BMD changes among the 4 active treatment groups. Older women, women with low initial BMD, and those with no previous hormone use gained significantly more bone than younger women, women with higher initial BMD, and those who had used hormones previously. Postmenopausal women assigned to placebo demonstrated decreased BMD at the spine and hip, whereas women assigned to estrogen therapy increased BMD during a 36-month period. These findings demonstrate that estrogen replacement therapy increases BMD at clinically important sites.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Relief of vasomotor symptoms and vaginal atrophy with lower doses of conjugated equine estrogens and medroxyprogesterone acetate.

              To evaluate the efficacy of lower doses of conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) plus medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) for relieving vasomotor symptoms and vaginal atrophy. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (the Women's Health, Osteoporosis, Progestin, Estrogen study). Study centers across the United States. Two thousand, six hundred, seventy-three healthy, postmenopausal women with an intact uterus, including an efficacy-evaluable population (n = 241 at baseline). Patients received for 1 year (13 cycles; in milligrams per day) CEE, 0.625; CEE, 0.625 and MPA, 2.5; CEE, 0.45; CEE, 0.45 and MPA, 2.5; CEE, 0.45 and MPA, 1.5; CEE, 0.3; CEE, 0.3 and MPA, 1.5; or placebo. Number and severity of hot flushes and Papanicolaou smear with vaginal maturation index (VMI) to assess vaginal atrophy. In the efficacy-evaluable population, reduction in vasomotor symptoms was similar with CEE of 0.625 mg/d and MPA of 2.5 mg/d (the most commonly prescribed doses) and all lower combination doses. CEE of 0.625 mg/d alleviated hot flushes more effectively than the lower doses of CEE alone. VMI improved in all active treatment groups. Lower doses of CEE plus MPA relieve vasomotor symptoms and vaginal atrophy as effectively as commonly prescribed doses.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                HRE
                Horm Res Paediatr
                10.1159/issn.1663-2818
                Hormone Research in Paediatrics
                S. Karger AG
                1663-2818
                1663-2826
                2004
                March 2004
                17 March 2004
                : 61
                : 3
                : 117-125
                Affiliations
                aDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, University of Tokushima, Tokushima, and bDepartment of Pharmaceutical Research, Mitsubishi Kagaku Bio-Clinical Laboratories Inc., Tokyo, Japan
                Article
                75523 Horm Res 2004;61:117–125
                10.1159/000075523
                14676459
                © 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Figures: 3, Tables: 3, References: 31, Pages: 9
                Categories
                Original Paper

                Comments

                Comment on this article