0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      Topical Anesthesia in Transconjunctival Sutureless 25-Gauge Vitrectomy for Macular-Based Disorders

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Purpose: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of topical anesthesia in vitrectomy using the transconjunctival sutureless 25-gauge system (TSV 25G). Methods:TSV 25G vitrectomy was performed prospectively in 46 eyes of 46 patients with macular-based disorders, including macular holes (n = 31), idiopathic epiretinal membranes (n = 11), and vitreoretinal traction syndrome (n = 4). Topical anesthesia was administered in each patient by instilling 2% Alcaine at 5 min intervals, three times before surgery. Additional Alcaine drops were given as a supplementation if needed during the operation. The levels of intraoperative analgesia were graded from 1 (adequate) to 3 (inadequate). Results: Thirty-one patients (67.4%) tolerated the procedure well, with no additional anesthetic agent. Thirteen patients (28.3%) required additional topical anesthesia and 2 patients (4.3%) required a systemic sedative. Intraoperative pain occurred when the sclera was pierced by the microcannula and when sclera indentation was performed. No patient required additional retrobulbar or peribulbar anesthesia. There was no intraoperative complication which was specifically related to topical anesthesia. Conclusion: Topical anesthesia permits the successful management of some surgically less complex vitreoretinal disorders when the TSV 25G is used.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 9

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Longer-term outcomes of transconjunctival sutureless 25-gauge vitrectomy.

          To report longer-term outcomes in eyes undergoing 25-gauge transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy. Retrospective, noncomparative, case series. Chart review of the initial 45 consecutive patients (45 eyes) that underwent TSV by one surgeon (T.S.H.) for idiopathic epiretinal membrane (n = 15), refractory diabetic macular edema (n = 11), idiopathic macular hole (n = 10), and nonclearing vitreous hemorrhage (n = 9). All patients had at least 6-month follow-up. Main outcome measures included visual acuity (VA), intraocular pressure, intraoperative complications, and postoperative complications. Mean follow-up was 13 months (range 6 to 25 months). Mean overall preoperative VA vs last postoperative VA was 20/229 and 20/65, respectively (P < .0001). Statistically significant VA improvement was seen for each patient subgroup. Mean preoperative intraocular pressure was 16.9 mm Hg (range 10-26 mm Hg). On postoperative day 1, week 1, and week 4, median intraocular pressure was 14.6 mm Hg (range 8-17 mm Hg), 17.6 mm Hg (range 8-38 mm Hg), and 17.7 mm Hg (range 9-33 mm Hg), respectively. No intraoperative complications occurred. Postoperative complications were 1 inferior retinal detachment (2.2%) 4 weeks after macular hole repair, 1 macular hole (2.2%) 6 months after epiretinal membrane peel, and 23 worsening cataracts in 29 phakic eyes (79.3%). Less surgically complex vitreoretinal pathology may be successfully repaired with TSV. After a mean follow-up of more than 1 year, minimal complications were seen, and none was specifically related to the sutureless nature of the procedure.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            A new 25-gauge instrument system for transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy surgery1 1The new Transconjunctival Sutureless Vitrectomy System is disclosed to Bausch and Lomb Surgical, St. Louis, MO. The Microsurgery Advanced Design Laboratory (MADLAB) may receive royalties related to the sale of this and other instruments mentioned in the article.

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Initial experience using the transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy system for vitreoretinal surgery1 1The new Transconjunctival Sutureless Vitrectomy System is disclosed to Bausch & Lomb Surgical, St. Louis, MO. The Microsurgery Advanced Design Laboratory (MADLAB) may receive royalties related to the sale of this and other instruments mentioned in the article.

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                OPH
                Ophthalmologica
                10.1159/issn.0030-3755
                Ophthalmologica
                S. Karger AG
                0030-3755
                1423-0267
                2007
                December 2006
                18 December 2006
                : 221
                : 1
                : 65-68
                Affiliations
                aState Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou; bJiangxi Eye Center, Jiangxi Provincial People’s Hospital, Nanchang, Jiangxi Province; cShenzhen Eye Hospital, Shenzhen, Guangdong Province; dEye Department, First Affiliated Hospital of Shanxi Medical College, Taiyuan, Shanxi Province, China
                Article
                96526 Ophthalmologica 2007;221:65–68
                10.1159/000096526
                17183205
                © 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                References: 14, Pages: 4
                Categories
                New Technologies in Ophthalmology

                Comments

                Comment on this article