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      How affective cues influence the perceived value of artwork

      1 , 1 , 1
      Social Behavior and Personality: an international journal
      Scientific Journal Publishers Ltd

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          Abstract

          We proposed that the effect of the hedonic principle, whereby people try to maximize pleasure and minimize pain, may not hold in the context of art (e.g., drawings, poetry). We conducted 4 experiments to test the hypothesis that sad artwork would be perceived as more valuable than happy artwork, on the basis that affective cues may be used to judge whether or not an artwork is unique. Results of Experiments 1 and 2 showed that participants valued sad artwork more highly than happy artwork. In Experiment 3 we examined if uniqueness perception mediated the effect of affective cues on perceived value, and in Experiment 4 we tested how different evaluation modes (joint vs. separate) moderated this effect. The results indicated that in the separate evaluation mode, participants had a higher perceived value of, and stronger preference for, happy (vs. sad) artwork.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Social Behavior and Personality: an international journal
          soc behav pers
          Scientific Journal Publishers Ltd
          0301-2212
          January 23 2019
          January 23 2019
          : 47
          : 1
          : 1-12
          Affiliations
          [1 ]School of Economics and Management, Tsinghua University
          Article
          10.2224/sbp.7325
          2c26b84c-c5d4-43a9-8c23-f394d289302c
          © 2019
          History

          Psychology,Social & Behavioral Sciences,General behavioral science,Family & Child studies,Development studies

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