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      Advances in the delivery of buprenorphine for opioid dependence

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          Abstract

          Opioid use disorders (OUDs) have long been a global problem, but the prevalence rates have increased over 20 years to epidemic proportions in the US, with concomitant increases in morbidity and all-cause mortality, but especially opioid overdose. These increases are in part attributable to a several-fold expansion in the prescription of opioid pain medications over the same time period. Opioid detoxification and psychosocial treatments alone have each not yielded sufficient efficacy for OUD, but μ-opioid receptor agonist, partial agonist, and antagonist medications have demonstrated the greatest overall benefit in OUD treatment. Buprenorphine, a μ-opioid receptor partial agonist, has been used successfully on an international basis for several decades in sublingual tablet and film preparations for the treatment of OUD, but the nature of formulation, which is typically self-administered, renders it susceptible to nonadherence, diversion, and accidental exposure. This article reviews the clinical trial data for novel buprenorphine delivery systems in the form of subcutaneous depot injections, transdermal patches, and subdermal implants for the treatment of OUD and discusses both the clinical efficacy of longer-acting formulations through increasing consistent medication exposure and their potential utility in reducing diversion. These new delivery systems also offer new dosing opportunities for buprenorphine and strategies for dosing intervals in the treatment of OUD.

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          Most cited references 93

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          Relationship between Nonmedical Prescription-Opioid Use and Heroin Use

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            Adjunctive counseling during brief and extended buprenorphine-naloxone treatment for prescription opioid dependence: a 2-phase randomized controlled trial.

             Roger D Weiss (2011)
            No randomized trials have examined treatments for prescription opioid dependence, despite its increasing prevalence. To evaluate the efficacy of brief and extended buprenorphine hydrochloride-naloxone hydrochloride treatment, with different counseling intensities, for patients dependent on prescription opioids. Multisite, randomized clinical trial using a 2-phase adaptive treatment research design. Brief treatment (phase 1) included 2-week buprenorphine-naloxone stabilization, 2-week taper, and 8-week postmedication follow-up. Patients with successful opioid use outcomes exited the study; unsuccessful patients entered phase 2: extended (12-week) buprenorphine-naloxone treatment, 4-week taper, and 8-week postmedication follow-up. Ten US sites. Patients A total of 653 treatment-seeking outpatients dependent on prescription opioids. In both phases, patients were randomized to standard medical management (SMM) or SMM plus opioid dependence counseling; all received buprenorphine-naloxone. Predefined "successful outcome" in each phase: composite measures indicating minimal or no opioid use based on urine test-confirmed self-reports. During phase 1, only 6.6% (43 of 653) of patients had successful outcomes, with no difference between SMM and SMM plus opioid dependence counseling. In contrast, 49.2% (177 of 360) attained successful outcomes in phase 2 during extended buprenorphine-naloxone treatment (week 12), with no difference between counseling conditions. Success rates 8 weeks after completing the buprenorphine-naloxone taper (phase 2, week 24) dropped to 8.6% (31 of 360), again with no counseling difference. In secondary analyses, successful phase 2 outcomes were more common while taking buprenorphine-naloxone than 8 weeks after taper (49.2% [177 of 360] vs 8.6% [31 of 360], P < .001). Chronic pain did not affect opioid use outcomes; a history of ever using heroin was associated with lower phase 2 success rates while taking buprenorphine-naloxone. Prescription opioid-dependent patients are most likely to reduce opioid use during buprenorphine-naloxone treatment; if tapered off buprenorphine-naloxone, even after 12 weeks of treatment, the likelihood of an unsuccessful outcome is high, even in patients receiving counseling in addition to SMM.
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              Clinical pharmacology of buprenorphine: ceiling effects at high doses.

              The purpose of this study was to characterize the acute effects of buprenorphine, an opioid partial mu-agonist, across a wide range of doses in comparison to methadone. Healthy adult male volunteers, who had experience with but were not physically dependent on opioids, participated while residing on a closed research unit. Four subjects received buprenorphine (0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32 mg sublingually and five subjects received methadone (0, 15, 30, 45, and 60 mg orally) in ascending order at 1-week intervals. Physiologic, subjective, and behavioral measures were monitored for 96 hours after drug administration. Both drugs produced typical opioid agonist effects (positive mood, sedation, respiratory depression, and miosis), some of which persisted for 24 to 48 hours. A plateau was observed for the dose effects of buprenorphine on subjective measures and respiratory depression. Pharmacokinetic data revealed that plasma concentrations of buprenorphine were linearly related to dose, indicating no limits on sublingual absorption in this dose range. This study shows a plateau on buprenorphine effects, consistent with its partial agonist classification, and that single doses of buprenorphine up to 70 times the recommended analgesic dose are well tolerated by nondependent humans.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Dove Medical Press
                1177-8881
                2017
                28 August 2017
                : 11
                : 2493-2505
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Psychiatry, Addiction Institute at Mount Sinai, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York
                [2 ]Department of Psychiatry, Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, USA
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Richard N Rosenthal, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Mount Sinai West, 1000 Tenth Avenue, 8C-02, New York, NY 10019, USA, Tel +1 212 523 6455, Fax +1 212 523 3477, Email richard.rosenthal@ 123456mountsinai.org
                Article
                dddt-11-2493
                10.2147/DDDT.S72543
                5584886
                © 2017 Rosenthal and Goradia. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

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