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      Proteomic Analysis of Plasmodium Merosomes: The Link between Liver and Blood Stages in Malaria

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          Abstract

          The pre-erythrocytic liver stage of the malaria parasite, comprising sporozoites and the liver stages into which they develop, remains one of the least understood parts of the lifecycle, in part owing to the low numbers of parasites. Nonetheless, it is recognized as an important target for antimalarial drugs and vaccines. Here we provide the first proteomic analysis of merosomes, which define the final phase of the liver stage and are responsible for initiating the blood stage of infection. We identify a total of 1879 parasite proteins, and a core set of 1188 proteins quantitatively detected in every biological replicate, providing an extensive picture of the protein repertoire of this stage. This unique data set will allow us to explore key questions about the biology of merosomes and hepatic merozoites.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Journal of Proteome Research
          J. Proteome Res.
          American Chemical Society (ACS)
          1535-3893
          1535-3907
          July 23 2019
          July 23 2019
          Affiliations
          [1 ]Department of Molecular Microbiology & Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, United States
          [2 ]Department of Biological Chemistry, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 733 N. Broadway, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, United States
          [3 ]Institute of Bioinformatics, International Tech Park, Bangalore 560 066, India
          [4 ]Institute for Systems Biology, 401 Terry Avenue, North Seattle, Washington 98109, United States
          Article
          10.1021/acs.jproteome.9b00324
          7105274
          31335145
          © 2019

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