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      Pathogenic triad in COPD: oxidative stress, protease–antiprotease imbalance, and inflammation

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          Abstract

          Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exhibit dominant features of chronic bronchitis, emphysema, and/or asthma, with a common phenotype of airflow obstruction. COPD pulmonary physiology reflects the sum of pathological changes in COPD, which can occur in large central airways, small peripheral airways, and the lung parenchyma. Quantitative or high-resolution computed tomography is used as a surrogate measure for assessment of disease progression. Different biological or molecular markers have been reported that reflect the mechanistic or pathogenic triad of inflammation, proteases, and oxidants and correspond to the different aspects of COPD histopathology. Similar to the pathogenic triad markers, genetic variations or polymorphisms have also been linked to COPD-associated inflammation, protease–antiprotease imbalance, and oxidative stress. Furthermore, in recent years, there have been reports identifying aging-associated mechanistic markers as downstream consequences of the pathogenic triad in the lungs from COPD patients. For this review, the authors have limited their discussion to a review of mechanistic markers and genetic variations and their association with COPD histopathology and disease status.

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          Most cited references 71

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          Immunologic aspects of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

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            Oxidative stress and redox regulation of lung inflammation in COPD.

             I Rahman,  I. Adcock (2006)
            Reactive oxygen species, either directly or via the formation of lipid peroxidation products, may play a role in enhancing inflammation through the activation of stress kinases (c-Jun activated kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38) and redox-sensitive transcription factors, such as nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB and activator protein-1. This results in increased expression of a battery of distinct pro-inflammatory mediators. Oxidative stress activates NF-kappaB-mediated transcription of pro-inflammatory mediators either through activation of its activating inhibitor of kappaB-alpha kinase or the enhanced recruitment and activation of transcriptional co-activators. Enhanced NF-kappaB-co-activator complex formation results in targeted increases in histone modifications, such as acetylation leading to inflammatory gene expression. Emerging evidence suggests the glutathione redox couple may entail dynamic regulation of protein function by reversible disulphide bond formation on kinases, phosphatases and transcription factors. Oxidative stress also inhibits histone deacetylase activity and in doing so further enhances inflammatory gene expression and may attenuate glucocorticoid sensitivity. The antioxidant/anti-inflammatory effects of thiol molecules (glutathione, N-acetyl-L-cysteine and N-acystelyn, erdosteine), dietary polyphenols (curcumin-diferuloylmethane, cathechins/quercetin and reserveratol), specific spin traps, such as alpha-phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone, a catalytic antioxidant (extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic, SOD mimetic M40419 and SOD, and catalase manganic salen compound, eukarion-8), porphyrins (AEOL 10150 and AEOL 10113) and theophylline have all been shown to play a role in either controlling NF-kappaB activation or affecting histone modifications with subsequent effects on inflammatory gene expression in lung epithelial cells. Thus, oxidative stress regulates both key signal transduction pathways and histone modifications involved in lung inflammation. Various approaches to enhance lung antioxidant capacity and clinical trials of antioxidant compounds in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are also discussed.
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              Requirement for macrophage elastase for cigarette smoke-induced emphysema in mice.

              To determine which proteinases are responsible for the lung destruction characteristic of pulmonary emphysema, macrophage elastase-deficient (MME-/-) mice were subjected to cigarette smoke. In contrast to wild-type mice, MME-/- mice did not have increased numbers of macrophages in their lungs and did not develop emphysema in response to long-term exposure to cigarette smoke. Smoke-exposed MME-/- mice that received monthly intratracheal instillations of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 showed accumulation of alveolar macrophages but did not develop air space enlargement. Thus, macrophage elastase is probably sufficient for the development of emphysema that results from chronic inhalation of cigarette smoke.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis
                International Journal of COPD
                International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
                Dove Medical Press
                1176-9106
                1178-2005
                2011
                2011
                05 August 2011
                : 6
                : 413-421
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Pediatrics
                [2 ]Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Bernard M Fischer, Duke University Medical Center, Box 103201, 356 Sands Building, Research Drive, Durham, NC 27710, USA, Tel +1 919 660 0258, Fax +1 919 660 0265, Email fisch005@ 123456mc.duke.edu
                Article
                copd-6-413
                10.2147/COPD.S10770
                3157944
                21857781
                © 2011 Fischer et al, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd.

                This is an Open Access article which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, provided the original work is properly cited.

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