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      Increased adiposity and insulin correlates with the progressive suppression of pulsatile GH secretion during weight gain.

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          Abstract

          Pathological changes associated with obesity are thought to contribute to GH deficiency. However, recent observations suggest that impaired GH secretion relative to excess calorie consumption contributes to progressive weight gain and thus may contribute to the development of obesity. To clarify this association between adiposity and GH secretion, we investigated the relationship between pulsatile GH secretion and body weight; epididymal fat mass; and circulating levels of leptin, insulin, non-esterified free fatty acids (NEFAs), and glucose. Data were obtained from male mice maintained on a standard or high-fat diet. We confirm the suppression of pulsatile GH secretion following dietary-induced weight gain. Correlation analyses reveal an inverse relationship between measures of pulsatile GH secretion, body weight, and epididymal fat mass. Moreover, we demonstrate an inverse relationship between measures of pulsatile GH secretion and circulating levels of leptin and insulin. The secretion of GH did not change relative to circulating levels of NEFAs or glucose. We conclude that impaired pulsatile GH secretion in the mouse occurs alongside progressive weight gain and thus precedes the development of obesity. Moreover, data illustrate key interactions between GH secretion and circulating levels of insulin and reflect the potential physiological role of GH in modulation of insulin-induced lipogenesis throughout positive energy balance.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          J. Endocrinol.
          The Journal of endocrinology
          BioScientifica
          1479-6805
          0022-0795
          2013
          : 218
          : 2
          Affiliations
          [1 ] School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia.
          Article
          JOE-13-0084
          10.1530/JOE-13-0084
          23708999

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